Yachting Magazine: Roger Federer and Lleyton Hewitt joined forces to promote a new style of tennis, make magic in process.

Recently, Roger Federer and Lleyton Hewitt were brought together to promote a new tennis concept called FAST4.

The result of a gimmick show turned out to be phenomenal footage of the two tennis stars hitting tennis balls back-and-forth between one another from speedboats.
 

See article at Yachting Magazine – Click here

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Categories: Latest news, On the water

Motorboat & Yachting: Pearl Motor Yachts has teamed up with the X-Factor to give its female contestants a treat who were welcomed aboard a Pearl 75 for a trip to judge Cheryl Fernandez-Versini’s St. Tropez home.

 

Pearl Motor Yachts has ventured into the world of reality TV by teaming up with the X-Factor for this week’s Judges’ Houses episode. The female contestants were welcomed aboard a Pearl 75 for a trip to judge Cheryl Fernandez-Versini’s St. Tropez home.

Chloe Jasmine, Lola Saunders, Emily Middlemass, Lauren Platt, Stephanie Nala and Kerrianne Covell (pictured above) were treated to a trip on the £3million motoryacht before singing for their place in next round’s live shows.

The producers said that Cheryl chose the Pearl 75 due to its Kelly Hoppen interiors, although there was no word on whether she would be buying one. Iain Smallridge, managing director of Pearl Motor Yachts, said: “It’s fantastic to see the Pearl 75 in all its glory on one of the world’s most popular TV shows.

“We hope the contestants enjoyed their trip aboard the Pearl 75, and we wish them all the best of luck during the next stage of the competition.”

The Judges’ Houses episode of the X-Factor will be shown on ITV1 at 9pm on Friday 3 October.

 
See article and pictures at Motorboat & Yachting – click here

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Categories: On the water

The ‘fairly active’ summer storm is forecast to head for the UK over the next week. A Hurricane called Bertha, which is currently in the Caribbean, could head towards Europe over the next week, the Met Office has warned.

 

Bertha is currently close to the Bahamas. Forecast tracks for the storm suggest it will head north, staying offshore from the eastern coast of the US before turning to track east across the Atlantic.

While all forecast models suggest the storm will head in the general direction of UK and continental Europe, there remains a lot of uncertainty about exactly what it will do.

One certainty is that as the storm heads north away from the very warm seas which drive its power, it will lose strength and become what’s known as an extra-tropical storm – so we won’t be seeing a ‘hurricane in Europe’, but there is a chance we could see a fairly active summer storm.

The development of hurricanes and extra tropical storms can present complexities for meteorologists, and Bertha is a good example of that.

 

 

Mixed forecasts
The Met Office uses several world-leading forecast models as well as its own, and this gives an indication of how certain a forecast is. If all the models agree, there’s higher certainty, if they diverge, we know the atmosphere is finely balanced and there are several possible outcomes.

In the case of Bertha each of the models we use gives a very different picture of what the storm will do. This ranges from Bertha heading towards France as a weak feature which will completely miss the UK, to it arriving as a fairly active summer storm.

In terms of timing, there’s also a spread of possibilities – but it looks likely that the earliest Bertha would affect the UK would be on Sunday or into the start of next week.

As time progresses, different models normally come more in to line with each other and uncertainty decreases. The Met Office will be keeping an eye on how this situation develops over the next few days to give everyone in the UK the best advice on what Bertha is likely to do.

Given the time of year and the potential heavy rain, strong winds and large waves Bertha could bring if it does head to the UK, sailors are advised to stay up to date with the latest forecasts and warnings from the Met Office over the next few days.

See the forecast track for Bertha and other tropical storms on The Met Office StormTracker pages.

 
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Categories: On the water

The Andrew Simpson Sailing Foundation has announced the finalised Guinness World Record criteria which sailing clubs and participants have to comply with to count towards the world record attempt.


A key update is that for a race to count towards the record it must have 25 boats taking part, rather than 25 sailors as previously communicated.

The newly finalised criteria include:
There must be at least 25 participants, i.e. 25 boats taking part at each location.

If a club has less than 25 participating boats, it will not be able to participate in the Guinness attempt, however organisers still welcome the club’s participation in the Bart’s Bash race and the club will still be able to submit the results for entry into the worldwide leaderboard.

The race start time and finish time must take place between 00.00 on the 21 September GMT and 23.59 on the 21 September GMT.

The distance of the course will need to be measured accurately using GPS. The course must be at least 1km long. This can be multiple laps of a shorter course.- The race must be at least 15 minutes long.

The race will need to have a single start and finish point (start line one side of the committee boat and finish line the other side is acceptable).

All clubs wishing to enter the Guinness world record attempt must have 2 independent witnesses. Clubs need 1 steward per 50 entrants; these can be safety boat drivers and crew.Registration for clubs closes on 14 September 2014. Individual online entries will close on 19 September. Anyone wishing to sign up after this date will be able to do so at the clubs directly.

What is Bart’s Bash?
With just under two months to go, this monster-size attempt has over 1,500 sailors from more than 550 clubs and 50 countries around the world signed up and fundraising to support the Foundation’s charitable activities.

‘Bart’s Bash’ will see racing held at hundreds of locations across the world simultaneously on 21 September 2014 at 11am (BST) in memory of double Olympic medallist and America’s Cup sailor Andrew ‘Bart’ Simpson.

Sailors are able to sign up on the day at clubs that have capacity but are encouraged to sign up at http://www.bartsbash.co.uk/ as soon as possible to allow clubs to make plans for the day, ensure safety measures are met, and so that people don’t miss out!

 
See article at Pratical Boat Owner – click here

 
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Categories: On the water, Racing

The Irish Coast Guard is urging people not to go to sea in unsuitable craft, such as inflatables bought from supermarkets.

 

Last month, the Irish Coast Guard attended more than 25 incidents over a few days which involved leisure activities and any one of them could have resulted in disaster and loss of life.

Incidents varied from inflatables being blown out to sea, to people being isolated by the tide and also a notable increase in the use of cheap dinghies with small outboards.

Now, as we’re experiencing ‘a scorcher of a week’, the Coast Guard is renewing its appeal for seafarers to ‘use the right tools for the job’.

Parents and guardians are advised to be vigilant especially where young teenagers are purchasing such equipment.

 
See article at Pratical Boat Owner – click here

 
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Categories: Accident, On the water

A Thames passenger ferry has crashed into a barge, causing hundreds of people to be evacuated from tourist boats and four suffering minor injuries.
 

Everyone on board the vessels was safely disembarked by emergency services following the crash at 2.15pm today. The City Cruises vessel suffered visible damage as a result of the incident near Blackfriars Bridge, but was not sinking.

A Scotland Yard spokesman said: “Police were called to the Thames, near the Oxo Tower, at 2.15pm today following reports of a passenger ferry and cargo boat in collision.
 
“The Metropolitan Police’s Marine Support Unit, Coastguard, London Fire Brigade and London Ambulance Service are all in attendance and are currently in the process of taking those on board the ships to shore. At this stage there are believed to be a small number of people with minor injuries including cuts and whiplash.”
 
“Nobody from either vessel entered the water following the collision, and neither boat is believed to be at risk of sinking.” It’s not yet clear why the two boats collided.

 

See article at Yachting & Boating World – click here

The 50ft yacht where Google executive Forrest Hayes was killed has been put up for sale in California.

 

The yacht where a Google executive was killed has gone on sale for $345,000 in California. Forrest Hayes, 51, was found dead aboard the 50ft vessel named “Escape” in November last year following an alleged heroin overdose.

Broker Richard Boland Yachts is now selling the boat, which was recently moved to the marina village in Alameda. The Alaska Flybridge 46 was built in 2006 and comes with twin Cummins 380hp engines and thermal night vision cameras.

It’s been reported that lots of people have been looking at the boat, but so far there have been no offers. Broker Richard Boland told SFGate that he doesn’t think events onboard will deter any potential buyers.

“I don’t think it will make a lot of difference. The massive upgrade that Forrest made to the electronics on the boat is what people are really looking for.”

Hayes installed a security surveillance system onboard to monitor a refurbishment of the vessel, which later proved prostitute Alix Tichelman had been on board when he died.

Santa Cruz police recently charged the 26-year-old woman with manslaughter after discovering footage of her injecting the victim with drugs and then leaving the boat when he fell unconscious.

See article at Yachting & Boating Worldclick here

BBC News: The wrecked Italian cruise ship Costa Concordia has been successfully raised from the under-sea platform it has been resting on for the past year, salvage workers say. The wreck – the target of one of the biggest maritime salvage operations in history – is now floating about 2m (6ft) off the platform.

 

In all, the refloating operation is expected to take six or seven days. The ship will then be towed to its home port, Genoa, where it will be scrapped.

The Concordia struck a reef off the Italian island of Giglio in January 2012 and capsized, killing 32 people.

Workers are slowly lifting the vessel by pumping air into tanks attached to the ship. The wreck was hauled upright in September but was still partially submerged, resting on six steel platforms.

The BBC’s Alan Johnston at the scene said that by midday a weed-covered streak of the hull had become visible as the previously submerged part of the ship gradually rose above the waves.

Salvage workers cheered with delight as they returned to Giglio’s port.

“The ship is upright and is not listing. This is extremely positive,” the engineer in charge of the salvage, Franco Porcellacchia, told a news conference.

He said the sixth deck of the ship had begun to emerge on Monday, and once that was fully above water the other decks would become visible in quick succession.

“When deck three re-emerges we are in the final stage and ready for departure,” he added.

Tugboats attached to the ship by cables have moved it a short distance away from the shore.

A search for the remains of Indian waiter Russel Rebello, whose body was not recovered from the wreck, is due to be carried out.

The Costa Concordia’s owners, Costa Crociere, estimate the operation to remove the wreck from the reef and tow it for scrapping will cost 1.5bn euros (£1.2bn; $2bn) in total.

 

‘Risks’

An engineer with Costa Crociere described the salvage efforts as “unprecedented”. “As with anything being done for the first time, there are risks. But we are confident,” Franco Porcellacchia said.

Hundreds of divers and engineers have been involved in operations to salvage the Concordia, which is twice the size of the Titanic.

Towing the ship to Genoa – about 200 nautical miles (370km) away – is due to begin on 21 July and take about five days. “The operation began well but it will be completed only when we have finished the transport to Genoa,” Italian Environment Minister Gian Luca Galletti told reporters on Monday.

Local residents have said they are glad the wreckage will be removed. “I am happy they are taking it away because to see a ship like that always there, with the deaths that happened, it gives us the shivers,” Italo Arienti told Reuters news agency.

The captain, Francesco Schettino, is on trial for manslaughter and abandoning ship, charges he denies.

 

 See full article, videos and pictures at BBC News – click here

 

BBC News: Hundreds of sailors have returned to London 11 months after setting off on the 40,000-mile (64,000km) Clipper Round the World Yacht Race. The 12 boats in the Clipper Race sailed between six continents.

 

Crowds greeted the boats as they arrived at Tower Bridge at 12:45 BST. Twelve teams, largely made up of novices, tackled hurricanes and tornadoes as they raced between six continents.

The crew from the winning vessel, Henri Lloyd, was presented with a trophy at St Katharine Docks.

The race was founded by Sir Robin Knox-Johnston, who became the first person to sail solo non-stop around the world in 1968-69.

He said: “It is a tight race, but in racing with a tight crew that is teamwork and that’s where you learn you can do things you didn’t realise you could do. You work together and you trust your lives to each other on a boat.”

 

Most of the crew members – 670 from more than 40 nations – were novices, although each boat was skippered by a professional.

The Clipper Race took in South Africa, Western Australia, Sydney, Singapore, China, San Francisco, Panama, Jamaica, New York, Derry and the Netherlands before returning to London.

Most of the crew members – 670 from more than 40 nations – were novices, although each boat was skippered by a professional.

The Clipper Race took in South Africa, Western Australia, Sydney, Singapore, China, San Francisco, Panama, Jamaica, New York, Derry and the Netherlands before returning to London.

 

See article and more pictures at BBC News – click here

 

British powerboat champion Shelley Jory-Leigh will be supporting disabled teen sailor Natasha Lambert by leading her safety boat team during the 2014 Sea and Summit challenge.

 

On 24 July, Natasha, aged 17, who has cerebral palsy and sails using her mouth to operate a ‘sip and puff’ mechanism, will embark on a month-long challenge sailing single-handed down the South West coast of England to Wales.

Shelley and her safety boat team (Gary Coleman, Dan Whapples and Andy Smith) will accompany Natasha on the 430-mile journey, following in an eight-metre rigid inflatable boat (RIB) powered by a BF250 engine kindly donated by Honda UK.

Shelley said: ‘I’m so excited to be supporting Natasha on her remarkable journey this July and August. ‘Honda has provided me with my old start boat from my early Honda racing days which is fantastic. I would also like to thank Redstone, who are supporting our team to be able to make this happen.

‘Ever since I first met Natasha I’ve remained friends with her and wanted to support her. She has been out in a powerboat with me and just laughed the whole time wanting to go faster!

‘Her magnetism and enthusiasm to succeed overwhelms me. She is determined to lead a more than normal life.’

Natasha said: ‘Shelley is just awesome and she’s a fab role model. I’m so lucky to have her and her team helping me and I really appreciate them giving up their time.

‘I’m so excited about this adventure- it’s going to be epic!’

The Sea and Summit challenge will see Natasha sail 430 miles and climb 2,907ft whilst raising money for the RNLI, the Ellen MacArthur Cancer Trust and the RYA Foundation, as well as the profile of sailing for people with disabilities.

See full article at Practical Boat Owner – click here

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