The 50ft yacht where Google executive Forrest Hayes was killed has been put up for sale in California.

 

The yacht where a Google executive was killed has gone on sale for $345,000 in California. Forrest Hayes, 51, was found dead aboard the 50ft vessel named “Escape” in November last year following an alleged heroin overdose.

Broker Richard Boland Yachts is now selling the boat, which was recently moved to the marina village in Alameda. The Alaska Flybridge 46 was built in 2006 and comes with twin Cummins 380hp engines and thermal night vision cameras.

It’s been reported that lots of people have been looking at the boat, but so far there have been no offers. Broker Richard Boland told SFGate that he doesn’t think events onboard will deter any potential buyers.

“I don’t think it will make a lot of difference. The massive upgrade that Forrest made to the electronics on the boat is what people are really looking for.”

Hayes installed a security surveillance system onboard to monitor a refurbishment of the vessel, which later proved prostitute Alix Tichelman had been on board when he died.

Santa Cruz police recently charged the 26-year-old woman with manslaughter after discovering footage of her injecting the victim with drugs and then leaving the boat when he fell unconscious.

See article at Yachting & Boating Worldclick here

Boatowners are urged to check the state of their boats before venturing on the tidal Thames, following an increase in the number of mechanical incidents.

 

The Port of London Authority (PLA) has advised boatowners to make sure they carry out routine mechanical inspections before heading out onto the tidal Thames. The warning comes after an increase in the rate of mechanical incidents reported on the river, with 11 in the six weeks around Easter.

Skippers are encouraged to check they have sufficient tackle and are able to anchor safely in the case of difficulties such as engine failure. The PLA adds that navigating the tidal Thames can be tricky, with up to 1.2m waves and a tidal flow of up to four knots.

Darren Knight, assistant harbour master (recreational) at the PLA, said: “Owners need to be sure that their vessel is in a reliable condition and able to cope with these demands, where engines will have to work much harder than normal. “They also need to pause and think carefully as to whether their vessel is suitable to navigate on the tidal Thames.”
See article at Motorboats Monthly – click here

AOC Group has put a 200-acre private island just off the coast of Sardinia up for sale, but Isola di Mal Ventre comes with a catch.

 

Who among us hasn’t dreamed of owning their own private island? The allure of a Robinson Crusoe meets Richard Branson lifestyle is an undeniable as it is expensive. But what if you could own your own island for less than £1 million? Surely there’d have to be a catch, right?

AOC Group is selling a 200-acre island off the coast of Sardinia for 1.2 million euros (£952,000) and the only catch is; it’s empty.

Isola di Mal Ventre has been inhabited on-and-off since the Roman times and has a well and building foundations, but as far as man-made structures go, that’s about it.

Instead, the new owner is promised “beautiful sandy beaches” and “a wide variety of flora and fauna”. The sellers even suggest that it “may be possible to construct a jetty”, allowing short hops to the mainland in a matter of minutes.

What’s more, they quote a local architect, who says that a “low-rise eco-style villa” could be constructed on the largely granite island.

Private islands don’t often go up for sale in the Mediterranean, and AOC Group estimates that this is the only one currently on the market.

 
See article at Motorboats Monthly – click here

 

Almost 1,000 people have downloaded anew Royal Yachting Association (RYA) smartphone app that aims to help the coastguard to track down missing boats. RYA SafeTrx is a smartphone app that enables boat users in UK territorial waters to plan their passage.

 

RYA SafeTrx, which is compatible with Android and iOS devices, allows users to plot and then upload their passage plan and estimated time of arrival.

If the estimated time of arrival is exceeded without the trip being completed, then the designated emergency contacts are automatically notified.

Using the data sent by the SafeTrx app during a voyage, the Maritime and Coastguard Agency will be able to pinpoint lost and stricken boats more quickly.

Keith Oliver, head of maritime operations at the MCA, said: ‘During a search and rescue incident, the UK coastguard collects vital information about the people and vessels involved.

‘When did they set off? Where were they going? When were they due back? What was their last known location?

‘These are all vital pieces of the puzzle and the coastguard welcomes any system that can contribute to the information gathering effort. RYA SafeTrx will help provide this information, meaning that valuable time is not lost.’

This technology has been in use in Ireland and Australia for some time, and now the RYA’s adoption allows members to take advantage of the service in UK territorial waters for free.

Non-members can download the app free of charge, and data logging credits are available in bundles of 10 for £1.49 or 20 for £2.49.

The app can also deliver performance analytics for those keen to plot their average speed or total distance travelled.

Stuart Carruthers, cruising manager at the RYA, said: ‘Although RYA SafeTrx is not intended as a replacement for regular approved safety devices (VHF, APIB, AIS, etc) it will be beneficial to the one million users of small powerboats, RIBs, PWCs and for dinghy cruisers for whom existing tracking technology is not always practical.

‘Until now a simple, cost-effective system of tracking and alerting has not been available for these boat users. When we learned about this app and its enormous safety benefits we knew that we had to bring it to the UK.’

RYA SafeTrx is available to download now from the iTunes app store, while Android users can find the app on the Google Play Store.
See article at Pratical Boat Owner – click here

A yacht was destroyed by fire after catching alight in County Down, Northern Ireland early yesterday morning. The fierce fire engulfed a 40ft two-masted glass fibre yacht near Rostrevor Pier.


Kilkeel RNLI volunteer lifeboat crew were alerted to the fiercely burning 40ft two-masted glass fibre yacht, which was anchored southsouth east of Rostrevor Pier,Carlingford Lough.

The owner had been contacted and confirmed there were two gas cylinders aboard the yacht but no people.

The Kilkeel lifeboat Frank William Walton was launched at 2.20am and quickly reached the stricken yacht which very quickly was ablaze from bow to stern.

One of the propane gas cylinders had already exploded so the lifeboat with, four fire-fighters from Warrenpoint and a mobile fire fighting pump aboard, stood off at a safe distance.

When the fire had somewhat subsided the lifeboat returned to the yacht and the flames were extinguished.

The lifeboat left the firefighters and the pump ashore at Warrenpoint and returned safely to the boathouse in Kilkeel at 6.45am.

Helm Gerry Smyth said: ‘It was vital that the lifeboat crew, the firefighters and the lifeboat were kept out of danger whilst there was the possibility of the gas cylinders exploding.

‘The yacht was extensively damaged and still afloat when we left the scene but importantly no lives were lost.’

 

See article at Pratical Boat Owner – click here

 

Light winds turned the 2014 event into an endurance test with the slowest ever winner; 715 finishers and 791 retirees. This extremely light winds, at times recording zero knots, turned the 2014 J.P.Morgan Asset Management Round the Island Race into an endurance test for its participants.

 

Held yesterday on Midsummer’s day, the race was one of the longest in the history of the 83-year-old race. There were 715 finishers and 791 retirees; race organisers said it is always regrettable to have more retirees than finishers but there was a very positive response from the majority of competitors nonetheless.

The slowest elapsed time for a line honours boat ever recorded in the race’s history was 08.51.37 achieved by Team Richard Mille on their GC32 foiling multihull – almost three times slower than last year’s winning time of 02.52.15, set by Sir Ben Ainslie’s AC45 catamaran team.

Most of the 1,585 entries started the race around the Isle of Wight in around three knots and bright sunshine and as the hours went by, temperatures rose but wind speed dropped leaving hundreds of boats becalmed and a large proportion of the 16,000 crew desperately seeking ways of making their boats go faster or resorting to stretching out on deck to enjoy the sunny conditions.

There were several standstills for many boats during the race, and other times when it was the tide, rather than the wind, that powered the yachts along.

First to the Needles was Jamie McGarry and Colin Moore’s Swan 45 Eala of Rhu but the going was slow and Sir Ben Ainslie, racing on the Farr 45 Rebel with members of his BAR America’s Cup crew, took longer to complete the first 13 miles than the record-breaking time he took to finish the entire race last year.

Rebel very quickly became involved in a match race with rival Farr 45 Toe in the Water crewed by injured servicemen and women who had served recently in Afghanistan and the lead swapped several times over the 50nms course though it was Capt Lloyd Hamilton’s ecstatic crew who nudged across the finish line ahead of Ainslie and his team of professionals.

‘This means everything to us,’ he said recording a time of 8 hours 51 minutes 39 seconds.

He added: ‘The guys are ecstatic at beating Rebel. They don’t know many of the America’s Cup sailors but they know and love Sir Ben Ainslie, so are thrilled.”

Racing debuts pay dividends
Another big battle to ensue on the water was between the brand new high-performance catamarans, the GC32s Team Richard Mille and Spax Solution making their racing debuts in the Solent.

Former line honours winner Pete Cumming had gathered together a professional crew for Team Richard Mille, including helmsman Paul Campbell-James and proved consistently faster than their rivals.

They took five long hours to reach St Catherine’s Point where the sea breeze kicked in to give the leading boats a big push over the next two hours towards the finish but just as they were within sight of the line, the wind in Stokes Bay died and their final flourish was delayed by a further hour to record a finish time of 8 hours and 51 minutes.

Cumming said: ‘It wasn’t the easiest race but these boats are superb – very fast even in light airs and fun to sail.’

First monohulls in battle royale
First monohull across the finish line was Dutch boat Tonnerre de Breskens, with a time of 9 hours 56 minutes 13 seconds but they too had a battle royale to gain an advantage over Mike Bartholomew’s Tokoloshe II, which trailed in just 22 seconds later after one of the biggest tests of endurance and patience since the Round the Island Race started in 1931.

The first Ellen MacArthur Cancer Trust yacht, Scarlet Oyster, crewed by PBO News Editor Laura Hodgetts, trust volunteers and six young people crossed the finishing line at 5.57pm – almost 10 and a half hours after setting off at 7.30am.

A total of 24 teenagers took part on the trust’s five yachts. Dame Ellen and a crew aboard the trust’s flagship yacht Moonspray were forced to retire, after becoming becalmed off Dunose.

Twelve hours after the first start, 246 boats had finished and a further 445 had retired but the rest were still out on the course valiantly trying to make the finish before the cut off time of 10pm.

Prize giving
The Gold Roman Bowl was awarded to a Folkboat, Madelaine, skippered by Edward Donald, who hasn’t quite achieved the record four wins of the Gold Roman Bowl by Edward Heath but he’s nearly there, having won it individually three times and the Donald family has collected this famous trophy four times.

The Tenacity Trophy, awarded annually to the skipper of the last boat home. This year it fell to Stuart Whitmore to win the applause. He crossed the finish line on his Sigma 33, Sixes and Sevens, (IRC3) at 21.51.35, having started his race at 0730 – 14 hours, 21 minutes, 35 seconds later.

Event organiser, the Island Sailing Club, runs the event with support from title sponsor J.P. Morgan Asset Management and the race partners for 2014: Dream Yacht Charter, Haven Knox-Johnston, Henri Lloyd, Nautica Watches, Old Pulteney, Raymarine, Red Funnel, Volvo Car UK.

Find the full results click here

See full article at Pratical Boat Owner – click here

Boat owners are being warned to beware of thieves after a spate of incidents across the country have been reported.

Outboard engines and other items have been stolen in recent months. The Police have responded by urging boat owners to report any suspicious activity in boatyards.

Clearly security measures are important and the Police have appealed for owners to think about the precautions they have in place.

Read two reports of recent crimes from boats:
Plymouth Herald
Thurrock Gazette

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Categories: Ownership, Security

Yachting and Boating World have put together a useful guide to help you work out which type of boat you may wish to purchase. They have broken down the market into key types of crafts – open day boats, cruisers, flybridge and fishing boat and trawlers.

Before you progress to choosing design types, the key questions highlighted by Yachting and Boating World are as follows:

  • Where will I use the boat and for how long?
  • How many people will be on board?
  • Will we (all) overnight on the boat?
  • How agile are the crew, is deck access a priority?
  • Do I want to be sheltered or out in the elements?
All these questions will help you when deciding on which boat is right for you.

Read the full guide on the Yachting and Boating World website.

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Categories: Ownership

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