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Yachting Boating World: Confusion over the yacht’s position meant the Margate RNLI lifeboat and other boats searched well into the night for the vessel and its solo skipper.

 

The skipper made a Mayday distress call at around 3pm on 5 July after his yacht suffered engine failure off Margate. The town’s all-weather lifeboat was tasked to search for the vessel.

The yacht’s initial position was given as the Queens Channel, around four miles north of the seaside town. However, no sign of the vessel was found.

A second estimation then assessed the yacht to be some 22 miles north of Margate.

But, despite the yacht’s skipper firing two distress flares, neither the lifeboat nor the other boats which had joined the search were able to locate the vessel.

The yacht was eventually located by a windfarm support vessel. Its crew spotted the yacht in shallow water close to Margate Sands, around three miles north-west of the seaside town.

The Margate inshore lifeboat was then launched to pick up the solo skipper and bring him to shore. He was checked over by South East Coast Ambulance Service before being taken to a local hotel for the night.

The yacht was by now aground on a falling tide so the all-weather lifeboat remained on scene. It towed the vessel clear on the rising tide just before midnight.

After checking the yacht’s seaworthiness, the lifeboat then towed the vessel to the safety of Ramsgate Harbour to be reunited with its owner. Both lifeboats returned to station by 04.45.

The Margate lifeboat deputy launching authority, Ian Lowe, said: “This was a long service call for the volunteer crew and its complexity reinforces the need for both an all-weather and inshore lifeboat at Margate.”

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Yachting Boating World: Timothy Lenz was living on board the boat when it caught fire off the coast of Saco, Maine. His wife’s ashes were on board when the vessel sank.

 

Timothy Lenz had kept his wife’s ashes on board his motorboat every since he moved onto the vessel.

The retired veteran, who lives alone, was on a trip to Connecticut when the engine compartment caught fire near Wood Island, Maine.

Lenz told the television station, WMTW that he tried to put out the flames with a fire extinguisher, but the smoke was too thick.

He took the decision to abandon his 31-foot motorboat, leaving behind his wife’s ashes. He was rowing away from the boat in his skiff when he was later picked up by a passing fisherman, who alerted the authorities.

The Coast Guard, Maine Marine Patrol and Saco Fire Department responded to the fire.

A spokesman for the Maine Marine Patrol said: “The vessel was fully engulfed when Marine Patrol arrived and was eventually extinguished by local Fire Department personnel. Marine Patrol transported Mr. Lenz to Camp Ellis where he was evaluated and released by local EMS.”

“Marine Patrol reports that Mr. Lenz’s boat sank as a result of the fire. No plans have been reported yet to recover the vessel,” concluded the spokesman.

Lenz said he has lost most of his valuables in the fire and subsequent sinking. But, he is trying to remain positive.

“If I had stepped into the boat any deeper with that black smoke, I probably wouldn’t have come back out. They probably would’ve found me,” Lenz told WMTW.

He said he is very grateful to the passing fisherman who came to his aid: “I’m just glad that a fisherman come by, saw me, because I was in the little dingy rowing away as fast as I could,” Lenz said.

An investigation is now underway to find out the exact cause of the fire.

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Categories: Accident, At sea

Yachting Boating World: Alchemist, the yacht belonging to the commodore of the Island Sailing Club, sank during the Round the Island Race on 2 July after hitting a shipwreck.

But it was good news for TP52 Gladiator who won the race and MOD70 Phaedo 3 who smashed the multihall record time.

 

Dramatic footage of the sinking of the Alchemist during the Round the Island Race has been released.

It was shot by a crew member of RNLI Mudeford, which rescued the crew just seconds before the yacht sank.

It started taking on water after hitting the shipwreck of the SS Varbassi just east of The Needles on the Isle of Wight. The vessel was competing in the Round the Island Race on 2 July.

4 July
The Dubois half-tonner, Alchemist, sank in 17 metres of water just east of The Needles, Isle of Wight on 2 July.

The yacht hit the wreck of the SS Varvassi while competing in the Round the Island Yacht Race.

The Junior Offshore Group (JOG) racer belongs to the commodore of the Island Sailing Club, Mark Wynter. He was not on board at the time, and none of the crew were injured in the incident.

The Yarmouth RNLI all weather lifeboat, the Mudeford RNLI inshore lifeboat and The Needles coastguard rescue team all responded to the incident.

The Mudeford RNLI rescued the crew just seconds before Alchemist sank.

Strong winds during the racing, especially south of the Isle of Wight, meant challenging conditions for many taking part. Racing for some of the smaller classes of yacht was cancelled.

The Yarmouth lifeboat was called to six incidents during day, including the loss of a mast, damaged rudder, crew injuries and damaged hulls.

The sinking of the Alchemist has been reported to the Maritime and Coastguard Agency. Pollution was minimal because the yacht had little diesel onboard.

Meanwhile a yachtsman was taken to hospital on 1 July after being knocked unconscious while practicing for the Round the Island Race.

The man, who is in his 30s, suffered serious head injuries when he was thrown onto a winch handle. He was on board a 40 foot Sunsail ocean racer.

Cowes RNLI took the man to shore where he was taken to St Mary’s Hospital. Despite the challenging conditions, race organisers say that only a small percentage of the fleet retired from the race.

The overwhelming majority of competitors – some of whom saw gusts to almost 40 knots – successfully completed the course.

The winners of the prestigious Gold Roman Bowl for the first IRC boat on corrected time was Bernard Langley’s TP52 Gladiator.

The crew completed the course in less than four and a half hours from Gladiator’s start, beating Sir Keith Mills’ FAST 40+ Invictus, which had Prince Harry on board as crew.

Gladiator’s owner, Tony Langley, is currently racing his other TP52 in Porto Cervo, Sardinia, but his three children, Tom, Charlotte and Bernard, who helmed, all took part in the race.

“It was a windy and rough race,” said boat captain Brett Aarons, “especially in the overfalls off St Catherine’s and Dunnose. It was very wet, both on deck and below.”

Nevertheless the team never held back, hoisting the A3 spinnaker at the Needles, before peeling to the A4 at St Catherine’s Point and hitting speeds of 20-24 knots.

“At that point we knew that we had a chance of a good result,” stated Aarons.

“At that kind of speed, the adverse tide only slows you by a small percentage. Once we were back in the eastern Solent we were still in the last of the west-going favourable tide and were almost able to lay the finish line in one tack – it was a huge advantage,” he concluded.

Meanwhile, Lloyd Thornburg’s giant MOD70 trimaran Phaedo^3, tore round the course in two hours 23 minutes and 23 seconds.

In doing so he smashed the record time Sir Ben Ainslie set in 2013 by a stunning 28 minutes.

Speaking after crossing the line, Thornburg said: “We’re over the moon, the team work on board was fantastic and it was just on the edge where we could keep the full main up, so the boat was totally powered up.”

The largest monohull in the fleet, Mike Leopard’s 100ft Leopard, took monohull line honours, but failed to beat the record time he set in 2013 by 13 minutes.

When asked for his take on this 80th race in its 85th Anniversary year, ISC Sailing Flag and head of the ISC Race Management team, Dave Atkinson, acknowledged the challenges.

“The heavy weather forced us into making some pretty major decisions in cancelling some classes but we feel that with safety always being paramount, we were entirely justified in doing what we did,” he said.

“There are a few sad faces but many more happy ones. We act as we do with the information that we have and at the end of the day I think it has been an incredibly successful weekend,” concluded Atkinson.

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Categories: Accident, At sea

Yachting Boating World: MS The World, the largest residential yacht on the planet, has visited London as part of its 39,000 nautical mile non-stop cruise during 2016.

 

The 644 foot MS The World is currently in London as part of its non-stop journey to visit all seven continents in 2016.

The vessel sailed up the River Thames on 3 July.

Launched in 2002, it has 165 luxury apartments on board, ranging in price from £660,000 to £8.5 million.

Essentially, The World is a floating city, with a range of amenities and services including restaurants, bars, a deli and grocery, sports centre, medical centre, art gallery, theatre, cinema and a boutique.

Residents spend, on average, around three to four months on board each year, although they can choose to cruise indefinitely.

The ship, which has 12 decks, is scheduled to visit other European ports in July, August and September before it passes through the Suez Canal and tours the Middle East in October.

From there it will sail to India, The Maldives, Malaysia and Borneo before sailing to Western Australia.

The World, which has a maximum speed of 18.5 knots and a draft of 6.7 metres, is managed by the Florida-based management company, ROW Management Ltd.

The Bahamian flagged ship is privately owned by 142 families from 19 countries.

On average, there are around 150-200 residents and guests on board throughout the year.

They are looked after by a long-standing crew of around 280.

The World was the idea of Norwegian shipping magnate, Knut Utstein Kloster. It was designed by Petter Yran and Bjørn Storbraaten.

Construction of the vessel began in May 2000 in Rissa, Norway and in March 2002, it set sail from Oslo on its inaugural journey.

The World is the first ship of its size burning marine diesel oil rather than heavy bunker fuel.

This makes it much more environmentally friendly, and allows it to call in areas where ships burning heavy fuel are banned.

The World is also the first ship to feature the unique Scanship wastewater cleaning system in which waste is filtered by means of a flotation system.

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Categories: Superyachts

Yachting Boating World: Pougher has now replaced Fiona Pankhurst as the president of British Marine, which has more than 1,600 industry members.

 

David Pougher, the principal of Deep Consultancy, has now been appointed president of British Marine. The organisation represents the leisure, superyacht and small commercial marine industry, and members include Princess Yachts, Berthon and Pendennis Shipyard in Falmouth.

Pougher takes over from Fiona Pankhurst who has held the position since 2014.

During her time as president, Pankhurst relaunched the organisation’s brand, aligning its members with Britain’s reputation for quality, excellent design and innovation.

As immediate past president, she remains on the management board of British Marine.

Incoming president, Pougher, has been involved in the UK marine industry for over 35 years. He retired from his position at Yamaha as Divisional Manager, Marine and All Terrain Business in 2013. Pougher then set-up Deep Consultancy, a marine business consultancy.

He has had extensive involvement with British Marine over the years, as a British Marine member and also through a number of British Marine groups and committees.

He has been a member of the British Marine Engines & Equipment Association, the Boating Environment & Facilities Committee, the British Marine Boat Shows Board and the British Marine Management Board.

On taking over from Pankhurst, Pougher said it was an honour to become the new president.

“My fellow British Marine members and the team at Marine House have my commitment, focus and drive to assist, support and protect over the next two years,” he commented.

“I look forward to this position and challenge and it’s my intention, during the next six months, to visit every region, every British Marine association and as many committees and individual members as possible,” he pledged.

Pougher’s appointment has been welcomed by British Marine chief executive, Howard Pridding.

“Firstly I would like to take this opportunity to thank Fiona for her commitment to British Marine during her time as our President and her enthusiasm in undertaking all of her British Marine duties. The successes she has helped to achieve will drive the industry forward.”

He continued: “I am delighted to welcome David as the new President and am looking forward to working with him and the new Vice-Presidents, Alice Driscoll and Anthony Trafford, to continue to raise the profile of the British marine industry both at home and overseas.”

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Categories: Boat industry

Yachting Boating World: Pougher has now replaced Fiona Pankhurst as the president of British Marine, which has more than 1,600 industry members.

 

David Pougher, the principal of Deep Consultancy, has now been appointed president of British Marine.

The organisation represents the leisure, superyacht and small commercial marine industry, and members include Princess Yachts, Berthon and Pendennis Shipyard in Falmouth.

Pougher takes over from Fiona Pankhurst who has held the position since 2014.

During her time as president, Pankhurst relaunched the organisation’s brand, aligning its members with Britain’s reputation for quality, excellent design and innovation.

As immediate past president, she remains on the management board of British Marine.

Incoming president, Pougher, has been involved in the UK marine industry for over 35 years. He retired from his position at Yamaha as Divisional Manager, Marine and All Terrain Business in 2013.

David Pougher then set-up Deep Consultancy, a marine business consultancy.

He has had extensive involvement with British Marine over the years, as a British Marine member and also through a number of British Marine groups and committees.

He has been a member of the British Marine Engines & Equipment Association, the Boating Environment & Facilities Committee, the British Marine Boat Shows Board and the British Marine Management Board.

On taking over from Pankhurst, Pougher said it was an honour to become the new president.

“My fellow British Marine members and the team at Marine House have my commitment, focus and drive to assist, support and protect over the next two years,” he commented.

“I look forward to this position and challenge and it’s my intention, during the next six months, to visit every region, every British Marine association and as many committees and individual members as possible,” he pledged.

Pougher’s appointment has been welcomed by British Marine chief executive, Howard Pridding.

“Firstly I would like to take this opportunity to thank Fiona for her commitment to British Marine during her time as our President and her enthusiasm in undertaking all of her British Marine duties. The successes she has helped to achieve will drive the industry forward.”

He continued: “I am delighted to welcome David as the new President and am looking forward to working with him and the new Vice-Presidents, Alice Driscoll and Anthony Trafford, to continue to raise the profile of the British marine industry both at home and overseas.”

See article at Yachting Boating World

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Categories: Boat industry

Yachting Boating World: The Mercy is the title of a new film by director James Marsh. It follows the story of Donald Crowhurst and his attempt to win the Golden Globe Race.

 

First look images of the new Donald Crowhurst film have been released, along with the feature’s name.

The Mercy stars the Oscar winning actors Colin Firth as amateur sailor, Donald Crowhurst and Rachel Weisz as his wife, Claire.

It is based on the true story of Crowhurst’s infamous attempt to win the first non-stop single-handed round-the-world yacht race, the 1968-69 Sunday Times Golden Globe Race.

Crowhurst had entered the race in hopes of winning the £5,000 cash prize to aid his failing business.

From the start, he experienced problems with his 40-foot trimaran, Teignmouth Electron, and left the Devon port on 31 October 1968 ill prepared for what lay ahead.

After encountering further problems, he secretly abandoned the race, remaining in the South Atlantic.

He reported false positions in an attempt to appear to complete a circumnavigation without actually circling the world. Log book entries found after his disappearance suggest that Crowhurst was driven to the edge of insanity.

His final entry, on 1 July 1969, was “It is finished. IT IS THE MERCY… I will resign the game.” The film title is a reference to this last entry.

Teignmouth Electron was found, unoccupied, by the Royal Mail vessel, Picardy on 10 July 1969. There is speculation that Crowhurst committed suicide by jumping overboard.

The Sunday Times Golden Globe Race was eventually run by Sir Robin Knox-Johnston.

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Categories: Boats

Yachting Boating World: New river and mooring conditions are being introduced at the Henley Festival this year to prevent overcrowding on the River Thames.

 

Boaters attending this year’s Henley Festival are being warned of new rules for the mooring of vessels.

Organisers were asked by the Environment Agency to update the regulations following concerns about safety as the event increases in popularity.

The festival is being held between 6-10 July 2016 at Henley-on-Thames.

Owners will, once again, be able to moor against the booms, which are left in place following the Henley Royal Regatta, which finishes on 3 July.

In a joint statement, Henley Royal Regatta and the Environment Agency said the changes were necessary for navigational as well as safety reasons.

“As Henley Festival grows in popularity, so does the number of boats mooring against
the Regatta booms. Not only does this increase the risk of the booms getting
damaged, it also considerably increases the tension on them, especially during high
winds or if there is a strong current in the river,” the statement said.

“Left unchecked, this could easily see booms, or the piles to which they are attached,
working themselves loose and being carried downstream, along with any boats tied
to them. This in turn could result in boats and other property being damaged, and
boat occupants getting injured,” it stated.

Only boats which have paid a mooring fee are allowed in the enclosed festival mooring area this year.

They have to be in their allocated position by 8pm, when the booms will be closed for safety reasons. These will be reopened 10 minutes after the end of the firework show.

Boats are also bared from double mooring.

“For health and safety reasons, Henley Festival does not allow boats to double
moor to paid for moorings under any circumstances, whether permitted by the
boat owner or not,” said the festival on its website.

“We reserve the right to enforce this rule on site, as necessary. We also remind you that adjacent boats must have sufficient space to manoeuvre in and out of their allotted moorings.”

Boat users who have not purchased a mooring, must continue to travel up and
down the river on the navigation channel.

“Dropping anchor is not permitted and the Environment Agency will move you on,” warn festival organisers.

Enforcement officers with the Environment Agency will be carrying out regular patrols during the Henley Festival to make sure boats owners comply with the rules.

The Environment Agency’s Harbourmaster for the River Thames, Andrew Graham, said: “I know from personal experience how wonderful it is to enjoy these events from a
vantage point on the river itself, so I’m really not surprised that more and more
people are coming to town by boat.”

He continued: “But things got a little bit out of hand last year, and we really don’t want anybody’s trip to be ruined due to a preventable accident. That’s what these moorings
conditions are all about.”

“If people respect them and they work well this year, then Henley Royal Regatta will be happy for boaters to moor against their booms again next year, and so will we. If not, we both might have to look at alternative arrangements,” added the harbourmaster.

More information is available from the festival website.

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Categories: Boat Show

Motorboat & Yachting: The Windermere Boat Show runs from July 1-3 at Ferry Nab Marina. Boats from Sealine, Jeanneau, Bénéteau and Bayliner will be on show at the Windermere Boat Show this weekend.

 

The show runs from Friday July 1 to Sunday July 3 at Ferry Nab Marina and entry is free of charge.

Tipped as the largest show in the north of England it aims to celebrate boating in the Lake District as well as showcasing over 150 new and used boats.

As well the boats there will be taster sessions, guided kayak trips around Belle Isle and stand up paddle boarding available.

Jason Dearden, managing director of Shepherds Marine and Windermere Marina Village, says: “I am absolutely delighted that for the first time Windermere’s boating community will be brought together in one location in what promises to be a great weekend.

“This is an opportunity for anyone to come and experience Windermere and chat to boat brokers and adventure providers about everything from kayaks to 40ft motor cruisers.”

For more information, go to the Shepherds Marine website.

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Categories: Boat Show

Yachting Boating World: Irishman Fanche Mahe stole the yacht from Saundersfoot in Pembrokeshire and attempted to sail for France because he was “sick of life”, a Welsh court heard.

 

Fanche Mahe, 30, admitted he stole the yacht, Summer Lily, when he appeared before Haverfordwest magistrates on 27 June.

He only managed to sail the vessel four-and-a-half miles southeast of Saundersfoot harbour before he was intercepted by the police on board the Tenby RNLI Tamar class lifeboat.

The owner of the Summer Lily had seen his yacht’s distinctive red sail heading into the distance when he had arrived at the harbour on the morning of 26 June for a day’s sailing.

He had immediately contacted the police who had requested the assistance of the RNLI.

The 17 foot yacht was towed back to the harbour. It had sustained around £50 worth of damage.

Haverfordwest Magistrates Court heard that Mahe, of County Galway, had initially refused to cooperate with the police officers.

In interview, he told officers his motorbike has broken down and he’d decided to take a boat and go sailing.

Mahe added that he was “sick of life” and wanted to “p**s off and go sailing”.

In Mahe’s defence, the court heard that the 30-year-old had come to Wales to look for work. He had been unsuccessful and after running out of money decided to go sailing.

Magistrates fined Mahe £293 and ordered him to pay court costs of £115 plus £50 compensation to the owner of Summer Lily.

See article at Yachting Boating World

 

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