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Yachting Boating World: MS The World, the largest residential yacht on the planet, has visited London as part of its 39,000 nautical mile non-stop cruise during 2016.

 

The 644 foot MS The World is currently in London as part of its non-stop journey to visit all seven continents in 2016.

The vessel sailed up the River Thames on 3 July.

Launched in 2002, it has 165 luxury apartments on board, ranging in price from £660,000 to £8.5 million.

Essentially, The World is a floating city, with a range of amenities and services including restaurants, bars, a deli and grocery, sports centre, medical centre, art gallery, theatre, cinema and a boutique.

Residents spend, on average, around three to four months on board each year, although they can choose to cruise indefinitely.

The ship, which has 12 decks, is scheduled to visit other European ports in July, August and September before it passes through the Suez Canal and tours the Middle East in October.

From there it will sail to India, The Maldives, Malaysia and Borneo before sailing to Western Australia.

The World, which has a maximum speed of 18.5 knots and a draft of 6.7 metres, is managed by the Florida-based management company, ROW Management Ltd.

The Bahamian flagged ship is privately owned by 142 families from 19 countries.

On average, there are around 150-200 residents and guests on board throughout the year.

They are looked after by a long-standing crew of around 280.

The World was the idea of Norwegian shipping magnate, Knut Utstein Kloster. It was designed by Petter Yran and Bjørn Storbraaten.

Construction of the vessel began in May 2000 in Rissa, Norway and in March 2002, it set sail from Oslo on its inaugural journey.

The World is the first ship of its size burning marine diesel oil rather than heavy bunker fuel.

This makes it much more environmentally friendly, and allows it to call in areas where ships burning heavy fuel are banned.

The World is also the first ship to feature the unique Scanship wastewater cleaning system in which waste is filtered by means of a flotation system.

See article at Yachting Boating World

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Categories: Superyachts

Yachting Boating World: Pougher has now replaced Fiona Pankhurst as the president of British Marine, which has more than 1,600 industry members.

 

David Pougher, the principal of Deep Consultancy, has now been appointed president of British Marine. The organisation represents the leisure, superyacht and small commercial marine industry, and members include Princess Yachts, Berthon and Pendennis Shipyard in Falmouth.

Pougher takes over from Fiona Pankhurst who has held the position since 2014.

During her time as president, Pankhurst relaunched the organisation’s brand, aligning its members with Britain’s reputation for quality, excellent design and innovation.

As immediate past president, she remains on the management board of British Marine.

Incoming president, Pougher, has been involved in the UK marine industry for over 35 years. He retired from his position at Yamaha as Divisional Manager, Marine and All Terrain Business in 2013. Pougher then set-up Deep Consultancy, a marine business consultancy.

He has had extensive involvement with British Marine over the years, as a British Marine member and also through a number of British Marine groups and committees.

He has been a member of the British Marine Engines & Equipment Association, the Boating Environment & Facilities Committee, the British Marine Boat Shows Board and the British Marine Management Board.

On taking over from Pankhurst, Pougher said it was an honour to become the new president.

“My fellow British Marine members and the team at Marine House have my commitment, focus and drive to assist, support and protect over the next two years,” he commented.

“I look forward to this position and challenge and it’s my intention, during the next six months, to visit every region, every British Marine association and as many committees and individual members as possible,” he pledged.

Pougher’s appointment has been welcomed by British Marine chief executive, Howard Pridding.

“Firstly I would like to take this opportunity to thank Fiona for her commitment to British Marine during her time as our President and her enthusiasm in undertaking all of her British Marine duties. The successes she has helped to achieve will drive the industry forward.”

He continued: “I am delighted to welcome David as the new President and am looking forward to working with him and the new Vice-Presidents, Alice Driscoll and Anthony Trafford, to continue to raise the profile of the British marine industry both at home and overseas.”

See article at Yachting Boating World

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Categories: Boat industry

Yachting Boating World: Pougher has now replaced Fiona Pankhurst as the president of British Marine, which has more than 1,600 industry members.

 

David Pougher, the principal of Deep Consultancy, has now been appointed president of British Marine.

The organisation represents the leisure, superyacht and small commercial marine industry, and members include Princess Yachts, Berthon and Pendennis Shipyard in Falmouth.

Pougher takes over from Fiona Pankhurst who has held the position since 2014.

During her time as president, Pankhurst relaunched the organisation’s brand, aligning its members with Britain’s reputation for quality, excellent design and innovation.

As immediate past president, she remains on the management board of British Marine.

Incoming president, Pougher, has been involved in the UK marine industry for over 35 years. He retired from his position at Yamaha as Divisional Manager, Marine and All Terrain Business in 2013.

David Pougher then set-up Deep Consultancy, a marine business consultancy.

He has had extensive involvement with British Marine over the years, as a British Marine member and also through a number of British Marine groups and committees.

He has been a member of the British Marine Engines & Equipment Association, the Boating Environment & Facilities Committee, the British Marine Boat Shows Board and the British Marine Management Board.

On taking over from Pankhurst, Pougher said it was an honour to become the new president.

“My fellow British Marine members and the team at Marine House have my commitment, focus and drive to assist, support and protect over the next two years,” he commented.

“I look forward to this position and challenge and it’s my intention, during the next six months, to visit every region, every British Marine association and as many committees and individual members as possible,” he pledged.

Pougher’s appointment has been welcomed by British Marine chief executive, Howard Pridding.

“Firstly I would like to take this opportunity to thank Fiona for her commitment to British Marine during her time as our President and her enthusiasm in undertaking all of her British Marine duties. The successes she has helped to achieve will drive the industry forward.”

He continued: “I am delighted to welcome David as the new President and am looking forward to working with him and the new Vice-Presidents, Alice Driscoll and Anthony Trafford, to continue to raise the profile of the British marine industry both at home and overseas.”

See article at Yachting Boating World

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Categories: Boat industry

Yachting Boating World: The Mercy is the title of a new film by director James Marsh. It follows the story of Donald Crowhurst and his attempt to win the Golden Globe Race.

 

First look images of the new Donald Crowhurst film have been released, along with the feature’s name.

The Mercy stars the Oscar winning actors Colin Firth as amateur sailor, Donald Crowhurst and Rachel Weisz as his wife, Claire.

It is based on the true story of Crowhurst’s infamous attempt to win the first non-stop single-handed round-the-world yacht race, the 1968-69 Sunday Times Golden Globe Race.

Crowhurst had entered the race in hopes of winning the £5,000 cash prize to aid his failing business.

From the start, he experienced problems with his 40-foot trimaran, Teignmouth Electron, and left the Devon port on 31 October 1968 ill prepared for what lay ahead.

After encountering further problems, he secretly abandoned the race, remaining in the South Atlantic.

He reported false positions in an attempt to appear to complete a circumnavigation without actually circling the world. Log book entries found after his disappearance suggest that Crowhurst was driven to the edge of insanity.

His final entry, on 1 July 1969, was “It is finished. IT IS THE MERCY… I will resign the game.” The film title is a reference to this last entry.

Teignmouth Electron was found, unoccupied, by the Royal Mail vessel, Picardy on 10 July 1969. There is speculation that Crowhurst committed suicide by jumping overboard.

The Sunday Times Golden Globe Race was eventually run by Sir Robin Knox-Johnston.

See article at Yachting Boating World

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Categories: Boats

Yachting Boating World: New river and mooring conditions are being introduced at the Henley Festival this year to prevent overcrowding on the River Thames.

 

Boaters attending this year’s Henley Festival are being warned of new rules for the mooring of vessels.

Organisers were asked by the Environment Agency to update the regulations following concerns about safety as the event increases in popularity.

The festival is being held between 6-10 July 2016 at Henley-on-Thames.

Owners will, once again, be able to moor against the booms, which are left in place following the Henley Royal Regatta, which finishes on 3 July.

In a joint statement, Henley Royal Regatta and the Environment Agency said the changes were necessary for navigational as well as safety reasons.

“As Henley Festival grows in popularity, so does the number of boats mooring against
the Regatta booms. Not only does this increase the risk of the booms getting
damaged, it also considerably increases the tension on them, especially during high
winds or if there is a strong current in the river,” the statement said.

“Left unchecked, this could easily see booms, or the piles to which they are attached,
working themselves loose and being carried downstream, along with any boats tied
to them. This in turn could result in boats and other property being damaged, and
boat occupants getting injured,” it stated.

Only boats which have paid a mooring fee are allowed in the enclosed festival mooring area this year.

They have to be in their allocated position by 8pm, when the booms will be closed for safety reasons. These will be reopened 10 minutes after the end of the firework show.

Boats are also bared from double mooring.

“For health and safety reasons, Henley Festival does not allow boats to double
moor to paid for moorings under any circumstances, whether permitted by the
boat owner or not,” said the festival on its website.

“We reserve the right to enforce this rule on site, as necessary. We also remind you that adjacent boats must have sufficient space to manoeuvre in and out of their allotted moorings.”

Boat users who have not purchased a mooring, must continue to travel up and
down the river on the navigation channel.

“Dropping anchor is not permitted and the Environment Agency will move you on,” warn festival organisers.

Enforcement officers with the Environment Agency will be carrying out regular patrols during the Henley Festival to make sure boats owners comply with the rules.

The Environment Agency’s Harbourmaster for the River Thames, Andrew Graham, said: “I know from personal experience how wonderful it is to enjoy these events from a
vantage point on the river itself, so I’m really not surprised that more and more
people are coming to town by boat.”

He continued: “But things got a little bit out of hand last year, and we really don’t want anybody’s trip to be ruined due to a preventable accident. That’s what these moorings
conditions are all about.”

“If people respect them and they work well this year, then Henley Royal Regatta will be happy for boaters to moor against their booms again next year, and so will we. If not, we both might have to look at alternative arrangements,” added the harbourmaster.

More information is available from the festival website.

See article at Yachting Boating World

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Categories: Boat Show

Motorboat & Yachting: The Windermere Boat Show runs from July 1-3 at Ferry Nab Marina. Boats from Sealine, Jeanneau, Bénéteau and Bayliner will be on show at the Windermere Boat Show this weekend.

 

The show runs from Friday July 1 to Sunday July 3 at Ferry Nab Marina and entry is free of charge.

Tipped as the largest show in the north of England it aims to celebrate boating in the Lake District as well as showcasing over 150 new and used boats.

As well the boats there will be taster sessions, guided kayak trips around Belle Isle and stand up paddle boarding available.

Jason Dearden, managing director of Shepherds Marine and Windermere Marina Village, says: “I am absolutely delighted that for the first time Windermere’s boating community will be brought together in one location in what promises to be a great weekend.

“This is an opportunity for anyone to come and experience Windermere and chat to boat brokers and adventure providers about everything from kayaks to 40ft motor cruisers.”

For more information, go to the Shepherds Marine website.

See article at Motorboat & Yachting

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Categories: Boat Show

Yachting Boating World: Irishman Fanche Mahe stole the yacht from Saundersfoot in Pembrokeshire and attempted to sail for France because he was “sick of life”, a Welsh court heard.

 

Fanche Mahe, 30, admitted he stole the yacht, Summer Lily, when he appeared before Haverfordwest magistrates on 27 June.

He only managed to sail the vessel four-and-a-half miles southeast of Saundersfoot harbour before he was intercepted by the police on board the Tenby RNLI Tamar class lifeboat.

The owner of the Summer Lily had seen his yacht’s distinctive red sail heading into the distance when he had arrived at the harbour on the morning of 26 June for a day’s sailing.

He had immediately contacted the police who had requested the assistance of the RNLI.

The 17 foot yacht was towed back to the harbour. It had sustained around £50 worth of damage.

Haverfordwest Magistrates Court heard that Mahe, of County Galway, had initially refused to cooperate with the police officers.

In interview, he told officers his motorbike has broken down and he’d decided to take a boat and go sailing.

Mahe added that he was “sick of life” and wanted to “p**s off and go sailing”.

In Mahe’s defence, the court heard that the 30-year-old had come to Wales to look for work. He had been unsuccessful and after running out of money decided to go sailing.

Magistrates fined Mahe £293 and ordered him to pay court costs of £115 plus £50 compensation to the owner of Summer Lily.

See article at Yachting Boating World

 

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Categories: Boat insurance

Yachting Boating World: The long awaited expansion of the Panama Canal has now opened. Thousands of people watched the first ship make its inaugural trip along the waterway.

 

The first ship, a Chinese container vessel, has sailed through the newly expanded Panama Canal.

Thousands turned out to see the Cosco Shipping Panama began its eight hour inaugural journey from the Atlantic to the Pacific on 26 June.

The expansion will double the capacity of the Panama Canal.

Speaking at the unveiling, the President of Panama, Juan Carlos said: “This is a great day, a day of national unity and a day for Panama. This is the route that unites the world, the Panama Canal.”

Work on the expansion project to broaden the canal started in 2007 and is reported to have cost US$5.5 billion.

It allows a new generation of larger ships – Neopanamax class vessels – to use the waterway.

It is hoped it will also increase the competitiveness of the shipping route, with liquefied natural gas (LNG) tankers now able to use the Panama Canal for the first time.

Commentators also believe it could change how goods are imported into the United States, one of the most frequent users of the canal.

Some are predicting that business will now be diverted way from Los Angeles and Long Beach – some of the USA’s busiest ports. Instead, more ships are expected to dock on the East and Gulf coasts.

Concern has also been raised about the economic slowdown in China – the second largest customer for the canal.

A drop in oil prices has also impacted on global shipping.

See article at Yachting Boating World

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Categories: Marina

Yachting Boating World: An investigation has now been launched after an abandoned boat was spotted on fire on the River Thames. It later sank close to the Wokingham Waterside Centre.

 

Thames Valley Police are now investigating the cause of a fire on board a boat which later sank. Officers on a towpath at Cholmeley Road, Reading spotted the burning vessel at around 1.30am on 27 June.

The boat was floating down the river behind the Thames Valley Business Park. Firefighters from the Royal Berkshire Fire and Rescue Service were called.

Two fire engines, the specialist appliance from Maidenhead and the water rescue unit and boat responded.

The crew on board the water rescue unit boat tried to reach the vessel to tow it ashore but the boat was so badly damaged that it sank near to the Wokingham Waterside Centre.

The police say that it is not believed that anyone was on board the 15 foot vessel. No one was injured in the incident.

A Thames Valley Police spokesman said: “Thames Valley police officers on a towpath at Cholmley Road, Reading spotted a fire on a 15ft boat (apparently abandoned) floating down the river.”

“Fire service attended and attempted to tow boat to shore but it was so badly damaged that it sank. It is not believed at this stage that anyone was on board at the time,” concluded the spokesman.

A team from the Environment Agency has since attended the scene to ensure the boat wasn’t causing a hazard to navigation.

See article at Yachting Boating World

 

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Categories: Accident, At sea

Yachting Boating World: The marine industry gives its assessment following the decision by the voting public to leave the European Union (EU).

 

It is too early to tell what impact the decision to leave the European Union will have on the marine industry.

What is clear is that there will be no immediate change to trading arrangements or legislation, or to free movement within the EU.

British Marine, which represents the leisure, superyacht and small commercial marine industry, has always remained neutral on the decision to leave or remain as part of the EU.

The organisation has more than 1,600 different members including Princess Yachts, Berthon and Pendennis Shipyard in Falmouth.

In a statement, the organisation said: “The result of the referendum has shown that the majority of the British public who voted wish to leave and during the forthcoming transition period, British Marine will inform and advise all its members and represent the interests of the industry to Government.”

It continues: “It is important for members to note that there will not be a change to legislation or trading arrangements for at least two years whilst the Government negotiates the withdrawal agreement with the EU.”

“British Marine will continue to ensure our members are informed about the implications for their businesses and will do so in representing industry concerns to Government throughout this transitional period,” the statement concludes.

In April, Superyacht UK, which represents the interests of the industry both at home and internationally,  announced growth in the sector.

According to the Superyacht UK survey, the industry grew by more than 10% to £542 million in 2014/15. Out of those surveyed, 48% reported an increase in profits. There was also a 6.9% increase in jobs.

Meanwhile, the Royal Yachting Association (RYA) has said it will continue to lobby European institutions to ensure minimum regulatory interference for boaters.

In a statement following the referendum on 23 June, it said the process to leave the EU will take time.

“The EU treaties will cease to apply to the UK from the date of entry into force of the agreement, or within two years of the notification of the withdrawal. The (European) Council may also decide to extend that period,” said the statement.

“Until such time, in terms of the advice regarding boating abroad on the RYA website, UK residents remain EU residents, the UK remains in the EU for VAT, Customs and Excise purposes and there should be little noticeable difference when sailing between the UK and other EU countries.”

See article at Yachting Boating World

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Categories: Boat industry

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