Yachting Boating World: The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge gave their support to Sir Ben Ainslie’s Land Rover BAR team as they took podium position in Portsmouth on 23-24 July.

 

Along with thousands of fans, the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge got fully behind Land Rover BAR as they stormed to victory in the Portsmouth regatta.

Sir Ben Ainslie’s team put on an incredible performance on both Saturday and Sunday and did enough to hold off USA Team Oracle from the top of the leader board.

Land Rover BAR won three of the six races in Portsmouth, with Oracle Team USA taking two and Groupama Team France taking one.

Speaking after the win, skipper Sir Ben said: “It was a real team work day, these boats are really hard to handle on such a short course. The guys did an incredible job with the boat handling and that’s what really got us out of some of those tough situations.”

He continued: “Full credit to the team and everyone back at the Camber at the base, we’ve got a hundred odd people there, designing and building boats and components for the Cup next year, and I think it’s a big moment for them as well to know that we can go out and win these events.”

Trimmer Nick Hutton, added: “It was awesome to win at home, it’s obviously the key event of our year. It is like Wembley for us.”

“The big picture is we have taken the lead in the World Series, for us as a new team it’s fantastic to go up against the established teams like Oracle, Artemis and Team New Zealand. It’s great moving forward into the future,” he stressed.

Grinder Freddie Carr said the win was an important step.

“We are in a massive phase of our Cup campaign at the moment, going into Bermuda next year and the lift this gives to everyone at the base – it’s huge,” he stressed.

“We are putting a real line in the sand for where our sailing team is at and our test boats are going really well. We are front-footing it right now it’s a great time for us,” continued Carr.

Land Rover BAR are now series’ leaders, with just one point separating them from Jimmy Spithill and his team.

There are just two events left in 2016. The next will take place in Toulon, France on 8-11 September.

See article at Yachting Boating World

0

Posted:

Categories: Racing

Pratical Boat Owner: Today marks 100 days to go until the America’s Cup World Series, Portsmouth (Thursday 23 – Sunday 26 July 2015).

 

The organisers are celebrating this landmark date by adding a three-night programme of entertainment to the event, including The Massed Bands of Her Majesty’s Royal Marines South Coast Proms for two nights on the Thursday and Friday and a Saturday night music concert with internationally-renowned acts.

Picture: South Coast Proms 2013 performed by the Massed Bands of Her Majestry’s Royal Marines under the direction of the Principal Director of music Lieutenant Colonel Nick Grace OBE Royal Marines. Pictured the Corps of Drums.

Taking place within the Waterfront Festival Arena on Southsea Common, the Saturday, 25 July, evening concert will be a paid-for ticket with purchasing details, line-up and schedule details to be announced in the next few weeks.

 
0

Posted:

Categories: Boat Event, Boat Show

Ministers today announced £7.5million of Government funding to support Sir Ben Ainslie’s America’s Cup team and their proposal to be based on the Camber in Portsmouth.

 

The news follows on from Portsmouth City Council’s decision to give planning approval for the site of the new base.

The announcement took place today at 10 Downing Street in the presence of the Prime Minister David Cameron, who said: ‘Sir Ben Ainslie’s project is truly fantastic news for Portsmouth and the Solent.

‘It will not only build on Portsmouth’s global reputation as a centre of marine and maritime excellence but will also deliver a real sporting and economic boost to the UK.

‘It is a great example of our long-term plan – creating jobs as well as opportunities for young people to develop their skills through apprenticeships.

‘This is an exciting and historic challenge and I hope the whole country can get behind Sir Ben’s campaign.’

BAR Team Principal and four-time Olympic gold medallist, Sir Ben said: ‘Portsmouth has a great maritime heritage and we felt it was a natural home for the team’s permanent base in the UK.

‘There is excellent access to the water for the team’s training and to host future America’s Cup events, with fantastic spectator viewpoints.

‘We hope through  our journey to bring the Cup home to Britain we will inspire more young people to get involved in the sport, along with supporting the growth of the marine sector in the Solent area to match the country’s F1 innovation hub.’

What’s next?
The headquarters will initially employ about 90 people, with many more potential jobs in the supply chain.

It will become the focal point for the design, construction and development of the team’s boats and will also provide sports science and fitness facilities.

An apprenticeship and training scheme will ensure the site is sustainable and there will be a drive to ensure the project acts as a catalyst to encourage participation in the sport of sailing, all areas of the marine industry and develop the talent of the future.

The project has the potential to bring significant economic and sporting benefits to the UK, particularly for Portsmouth and the wider Solent area.  A recent report on Team New Zealand suggested that its base in Auckland created 1,000 jobs and brought an $88million boost to the local economy.

A visitor centre showcasing the sport, innovation, technology and sustainability will be at the heart of the base, and will welcome schools and community groups. Visitors will experience the construction and on-going operation of the team’s America’s Cup boats first-hand.

In accordance with the team’s sustainability goals – monitored and supported by 11th Hour Racing Inc. – the base will be built to the BREEAM Excellent standard.

Timescale
Construction work will start immediately, with planned completion in May 2015. Jonathan Goring will be responsible for the project at Ben Ainslie Racing, and he will run a completely separate team and budget to ensure that the base construction has no impact on the crucial drive to win the America’s Cup in 2017.

Goring was Managing Director of Capita Symonds, involved in the London 2012 Olympics, and CEO of Capita’s successful consortium that was selected to run the Defence Infrastructure Organisation.
See full article and watch Ben Ainslie Racing Team Base 3D Animation at Pratical Boat Owner – click here

Race 8 was one of surprises, except for one, the result in the defining race of the LV Cup. Emirates Team New Zealand is the winner of the Louis Vuitton Cup and will be the Challengers for the 34th Americas Cup which starts on 7 Sept. But unlike the procession of wins that the score line suggests, this race was one of surprises, at least in the opening stages.

The weather threw the first curved ball at an event that has been dealt more than it’s fair share of hurdles. From too much breeze, to barely any and thick fog with it, Race 8 started in conditions that we haven’t seen before in San Francisco. As the fog rolled in under the Golden Gate Bridge the visibility was so bad that the TV helicopters couldn’t provide the overhead pictures that we’ve become so used to.

“It’s a little different coming into the pre-start when you don’t know where the other boat is,” said Kiwi skipper Dean Barker after the race.

A match race in the pre-start provided the next surprise as the two boats replicated the kind of jostling more commonly seen in monohull racing. But as the seconds counted down it was the Kiwis who got the better start once again, starting to windward and overhauling the Italians to the first mark. But just as we thought we’d seen it all in this one sided LV series, out came the code zeros for the downwind leg. The light conditions meant that foiling was not going to happen and both boats opted for the additional power that these furling sails provided.

Kiwis win LVC

Emirates Team New Zealand is the winner of the Louis Vuitton Cup and will be the Challengers for the 34th Americas Cup which starts on 7 Sept. But unlike the procession of wins that the score line suggests, this race was one of surprises, at least in the opening stages.

The weather threw the first curved ball at an event that has been dealt more than it’s fair share of hurdles. From too much breeze, to barely any and thick fog with it, Race 8 started in conditions that we haven’t seen before in San Francisco. As the fog rolled in under the Golden Gate Bridge the visibility was so bad that the TV helicopters couldn’t provide the overhead pictures that we’ve become so used to.

“It’s a little different coming into the pre-start when you don’t know where the other boat is,” said Kiwi skipper Dean Barker after the race.

A match race in the pre-start provided the next surprise as the two boats replicated the kind of jostling more commonly seen in monohull racing. But as the seconds counted down it was the Kiwis who got the better start once again, starting to windward and overhauling the Italians to the first mark. But just as we thought we’d seen it all in this one sided LV series, out came the code zeros for the downwind leg. The light conditions meant that foiling was not going to happen and both boats opted for the additional power that these furling sails provided.

 

But that was where the surprises finished and the familiar dominance of the Kiwis took over. By the bottom mark Emirates Team New Zealand was 1min 31 seconds ahead.

As the race unfolded the picture got worse for Italian fans. With the Kiwis sailing upwind at 19knots to the Italians 17knots the race was only going one way. By the weather mark the Kiwis had opened up a lead of 1000m as they turned to head downwind for the last time.

On this leg the breeze had increased to around 12-14knots and it was back to foiling with no code zero, at least not for the Kiwis. The Italians did hoist and set their zero but it was too little too late. The game was over for Luna Rossa, you could see it in their body language and hear it in skipper Chris Draper’s voice as he called for the gybes.

By the finish they were 3min 31seconds behind.

“It hurts bad to lose 7:1 but the Kiwis did a great job. We’re sad but proud,” said Chris Draper. For Barker, the win wasn’t a surprise as much as a relief, after a few scares along the way they had made it through the Louis Vuitton series to win for a third time and gain the right to challenge for the 34th America’s Cup. “It’s a step along the way,” said skipper Dean Barker. “This is all part of the preparation. We won the LV Cup but came up short in 2007 in Valencia so we’re going to be giving it all for the Cup.

Read more at Yachtingworld – click here

0

Posted:

Categories: Velos Insurance News

A British Olympic sailor has died after a Swedish catamaran capsized during a training session for the America’s Cup in San Francisco Bay.

Andrew “Bart” Simpson – a double Olympic medallist – was one of an 11-man crew on board the Artemis Racing catamaran, the team website said. It said Mr Simpson, 36, from Sherborne in Dorset, was trapped under the boat and efforts to revive him failed.

Artemis is a Swedish team due to take part in the America’s Cup. On its website, Artemis Racing said: “It is with immense sadness that Artemis Racing confirms the tragic death of crewmember Andrew ‘Bart’ Simpson today in San Francisco.”

At a news conference by the Bay, Artemis chief executive Paul Cayard said it was a “tragic day” for the crew.

“We have a lot to deal with in the next few days in terms of assuring everybody’s wellbeing,” Mr Cayard said, as he offered his thoughts and prayers to Mr Simpson’s wife and family.

Mr Simpson represented Great Britain at two Olympic Games, sailing in the Star class alongside Iain Percy, his Artemis team boss.

The pair took gold at the Beijing 2008 Games and were close at London 2012 to topping the podium once more, only to claim silver in the medal race.

Before last summer’s Olympics, Mr Simpson admitted that winning the America’s Cup was his biggest goal.

Cause unclear
John Derbyshire, performance director of the UK’s Royal Yachting Association (RYA), described Simpson as an inspiration to others. “We’re devastated by the news from San Francisco today,” he said.

“Andrew is someone I’ve worked closely with since the age of 16. He was a great talent and a key figure in our World Class Programme over many years culminating in his well-deserved Olympic success.

“He was a huge inspiration to others, both within the British Sailing Team and across the nation and our deepest sympathies go out to his family at this terrible time.”

Paul Cayard: “It’s a shocking experience to go through”

Stephen Park, RYA Olympic Manager, described Mr Simpson as “a fantastic sailor who got the best out of everyone he sailed with”.

Artemis said that doctors “afloat” with the team tried unsuccessfully to revive the British sailor after he was freed from the wreckage.

San Francisco Fire Department spokeswoman Mindy Talmadge said that, following the capsize, two sailors were brought to shore and taken to the St Francis Yacht Club where paramedics performed CPR on one of them.

The other person’s injuries were not life-threatening, she said.

The rest of the crew from the capsized boat were transferred to a support boat operated by Oracle Racing, which is defending its America’s Cup title from last year, officials said.

Mr Simpson served as the Swedish team’s strategist.

Lt Jeannie Crump of the Coast Guard said it was not yet clear what caused the 72ft (22m) boat to capsize.

She said that a commercial salvage boat would tow the vessel to Clipper Cove, between Yerba Buena Island and Treasure Island.

The America’s Cup is inshore yachting’s premier event, and will take place in San Francisco this year between July and September.

Multi-million pound syndicates use cutting-edge design and technology as the world’s best sailors battle it out for the oldest trophy in sport.

The first race for The “Auld Mug” took place around the Isle of Wight in 1851.

US yacht America won to spark 132 years of US domination until Australia II broke the deadlock in 1983.

Simpson is believed to be the second sailor to have died during training for the race.

In 1999, Martin Wizner of the Spanish Challenge was fatally injured after being struck on the head by a broken piece of equipment.

Read article at BBC News – click here

0

Posted:

Categories: Velos Insurance News

Contact Us

Tel: +44 (0)20 7929 4058
Fax: +44 (0)20 7933 9350
Click here to email us

Velos Insurance Services Limited
52-54 Gracechurch Street
London, EC3V 0EH
View map

Connect with us


Latest News

British sailor Elliot Willis is fundraising for cancer charity

Practical Boat Owner: British Sailing Team sailor Elliot Willis is cycling 250 miles this September for The Royal Marsden Cancer Charity: ‘Because they got me to this point where I feel I can do it.’   The Team GB

September 16, 2016 read more