Yachting World: Perfect conditions for Day 1 of Antigua Sailing Week

In CSA 4, Ian Hope Ross’ Melges 32, Kick ’em Jenny 2 took the gun and the win on corrected time by just over a minute. Ian’s team from St Maarten is returning to Antigua Sailing Week after racing here last year: “We have a good set-up on the dock, we have sailed down with a catamaran and it’s our mother ship for the week,” explained Ian enjoying a cold Wadadli in the cockpit in Falmouth Marina.

“We didn’t have a good start today and got into bad air. But by the second mark we had stitched it all back together and got into clear air. We had Bernie [Evan-Wong] on High Tension breathing down our neck all day and the two Cork 1720s are very well sailed.

This is a very competitive class, but today the short chop suited us more than the other boats. This is only day one and we are not celebrating too much, there is plenty of racing to come.”

Kick ’em Jenny 2, Ian Hope Ross’ Melges 32 wins CSA 4 in the AUA College of Medicine Race Day
Credit: Tim Wright/Photoaction.com/Antigua Sailing Week
In Class Zero, British Farr 100, ICAP Leopard with owner Mike Slade at the helm, got away to a blistering start and quickly pulled away from the chasing pack including Andy Budgen’s Volvo 70, Monster Project.

Leopard hit the turbo button off the breeze to take line honours by half an hour and the pro-crew was joined today by Mike’s wife, Heather and four friends who enjoyed a high speed sail on one of the world’s fastest yachts: “I love coming here, what is there not to like?” quizzed Mike Slade dockside. “We have been coming to Antigua since 1990 and it is one of my favourite places to sail.

Leopard has been very busy since the start of the year, giving many guests the perfect way to enjoy the Caribbean and Antigua Sailing Week is a marvellous way to round off the season.”

Piet Vroon’s Dutch Ker 46, Tonnerre de Breskens 3, has enjoyed plenty of success in the Caribbean this season and corrected out to win CSA 0 in Race 1 by three minutes from Rob Date’s Australian RP52, Scarlet Runner.

Start Boat B ran courses from Rendezvous Bay past Curtain Bluff and Old Road. The breeze was from the southeast and a shifting breeze kept drivers and trimmers on their toes.

In CSA 6, Tom Wilson racing British Swan 44, Selene corrected out to win Race 1. Selene’s owner Adrian Lower was on board and over the moon about the win: “Absolutely delighted,” commented Adrian. “Tom is an old mate and when he said he was looking for a boat to charter for Antigua Sailing Week, I said yes straight away.

Also on board we have Stephon Dundas, who is from St. John’s, Antigua and is sailing on Selene for the second year in a row. Stephon oversees the front of the boat and I look after the back. We had a good start but we were almost over early, so the heart rate was up a bit there. Selene had a great battle with Tatonka all the way around the track.

The Tatonka team sailed a great race and they obviously know exactly what they are doing. We thought we might have a podium place today but to win was above our expectations. What a brilliant start to the week!”

In Bareboat 1, just four minutes separated the top four boats in a three hour race. Garvey Colman’s Irish team on Bageal is returning after coming second in class last year. Bageal corrected out to win the first race of the regatta by less than a minute from the Kiev Racing Club. Nicholas Jordan’s Just De Ting completed the podium, placing third just ahead of Marcelo Baltzer Foucher’s Pinel.

Bageal’s skipper, Garvey Colman spoke after the race. “We came here last year and didn’t win a single race, so we are delighted to take a win on the first day, but we had to dig deep. We were fifth after the first beat and the boys got properly stuck in to challenge the team from Kiev in the lead.

On the last beat, Kiev was covering us from the front and we took them on in a tacking duel. We were pulling out all the stops and we tired them out to take the win. We enjoy a few beers after racing, but if the first day is anything to go by, we are going to need to be very sharp tomorrow.”

After racing the American University of Antigua College of Medicine Daily Prize Giving drew a big crowd. Chief Marketing Officer, Dr. Cory Greenburg was on stage to hand out the AUA College of Medicine prize bags to the winner and the sailors were delighted. The barbecue grills were smoking and the icemakers were on.

Tonight’s main entertainment is Rum and Rhythms: Reggae with Idus and International sounds from Strays. The America’s Cup Trophy will be on show in the Antigua Yacht Club Marina lounge from 6 to 8 pm. The sun is setting on the first day of Antigua Sailing Week.

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A reader’s question about drilling acrylic is answered by one of PBO’s experts.

QUESTION: 
Are there any special things I should know about drilling acrylic? I want to drill some holes quite close to the edge of a piece around 8mm thick. Any tips would be greatly appreciated.

DICK EVERITT REPLIES:

Special acrylic drilling bits are ideal, but I’ve managed with ordinary twist drills. Practise on a scrap piece of acrylic and if there is a tendency for the drill to dig in and chip the surface, grind the drill’s cutting edges back a bit. Simply flatten them against the side of the grinding wheel, as shown in the photo.

A drill press is great for keeping everything square, but a manual or powered hand drill also works fi ne. Clamp the acrylic down carefully, being careful not to scratch the surface, and have a scrap piece of acrylic or hardwood underneath.

This gives the right resistance to the drill point as it keeps cutting and prevents the sides of the drill from bursting through and chipping the edge of the hole. Use a slow speed, drill a pilot hole and make a circular dam of plasticine around the hole to hold water to lubricate and cool the job.

Work slowly and keep taking the load off the drill so it doesn’t heat up and crack the plastic. If the hole is for a bolt, drill it slightly oversize and rub off the sharp edges with a countersink or larger drill, to prevent stresses building up as you clamp everything down.

There are all sorts of acrylic plastics: some drill like soft cheese, others seem to work-harden and always want to chip, so good luck!
PBO’s free Ask the Experts service for readers calls on the help of 16 professionals, all with different specialisms.

Read more at Practical Boat Owner – click here

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Categories: Boat protection

A barge anchor weighing 400kg has been stolen from a yacht club’s compound in Barmouth, north Wales.

Local police believe the thieves would have required heavy lifting gear in order to make off with the large anchor.

Authorities suspect that the object was stolen sometime since the beginning of March.

Investigating officer PCSO Paul Duggan told the BBC: “Clearly the anchor is very heavy and would have required heavy lifting gear, a vehicle and a fair amount of time to take from the compound.

“Any vehicles used will have been parked in the adjacent harbour public car park and alongside the 10ft high boundary fence and so I’m hopeful someone will have witnessed the act.”

This isn’t the first time an incident of this kind has occurred, with a 4.5 tonne anchor being stolen from a sunken cargo ship off the Gower coast in 2012.

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Categories: Boat insurance

Aquastar 430 Aft Cockpit jumps on the single-level living bandwagon.

With the Aquastar 430 Aft Cockpit the Guernsey yard has entered the fray of the single-level living, wheelhouse cruisers.

And, due to the Hardy 40DS making waves at this year’s London Boat Show, the timing of Aquastar making a boat like this couldn’t be better.

Using the same hull as the existing 430 Aft Cabin means production costs are kept to a minimum and Design Unlimited could go to work on the superstructure. The enlarged windows, that are so much a part of Aquastar’s designs now, transfer nicely on to this wheelhouse outline and, all in all, it looks like a natural transition.

The aft cabin boat’s interior is gorgeous and the one on this new model is unlikely to be any different. The level of craftsmanship is top notch, especially the sumptuously lacquered woodwork.There are two cabins below decks – a double master in the bow and bunks amidships – and both share a bathroom.

The master has scissor-action berths, too, so it can quickly be made into a twin.The standard engines are twin diesels but there is the option to have a single and you can even spec a hybrid drive.

You can read more about the boat in the upcoming June issue of Motor Boat & Yachting and we expect to see the boat for the first time in September at the Southampton Boat Show.

Data
Length 43ft
Beam 14ft 6in
Draught 3ft
Engines Single or twin diesels
Top speed 24 knots (MBY est)
Price from £440,000 inc UK VAT

 

Read article at Motorboat & Yachting – click here

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Categories: Boat launch

The RNLI were called out on Saturday evening when a yacht being sailed by its new owner ran aground on rocks at Redcar.

A yacht ran aground on rocks at Redcar on Saturday evening after trying to avoid Teesside wind farm.

Lifeboats came to the aid of the stricken yacht, which was being sailed for the first time by its new owner.

The two crewmen onboard were headed for Hartlepool Marina having purchased the boat at Whitby earlier in the day.

The grounded yacht was spotted just after 6pm by an off-duty Redcar RNLI volunteer.

Redcar RNLI’s Dave Cocks said: “When our volunteer crew got alongside the yacht, the two men on board told them one of the men had just bought the yacht and this was their first attempt to sail it.”

“In an attempt to avoid sailing through the Teesside Wind Farm, they decided to stay close inshore but unfortunately that brought them into contact with rocks off Redcar.”

Two RNLI volunteers joined the crew onboard the yacht and waited for the tide to rise.

At 11.40pm the yacht was refloated and escorted to Hartlepool as the crew were unable to navigate the vessel in the dark.

Mr Cocks said: “Neither of the yacht’s crew were able to navigate at night, so two of our crew remained on board for the passage to Hartlepool.”

“The yacht was not carrying navigation charts so, even if they had been qualified, they couldn’t have plotted a route.”

Read article at Yachting & Boating World – click here

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A wealthy man has come forward to claim a luxury boat that has been floating in a Swedish harbour for at least two years, after he apparently forgot all about it. The boat was left with its keys tied to the railings.

The boat’s Norwegian owner says he intended to sell the vessel in 2012 – and was under the impression that he had, Expressen GT newspaper reports. The boat, said to be worth as much as $108,000 (£65,000), was moored in the Swedish town of Stromstad, close to Norway’s southern border. The keys were tied to the railings for all to see.

Eventually, police issued a Facebook appeal for any information about its owner. The appeal was picked up by Norwegian media, including national broadcaster NRK, especially after items such as newspapers and a diary on board the US-made Rinker 342 Fiesta Vee suggested there was a Norwegian link.

Finally on 26 March someone stepped forward, saying he was the owner and had simply forgotten about his boat. “You have to be very wealthy to be able to forget about a boat in this price range,” Swedish police inspector Tomas Andersson told the paper.

The owner now has to collect the boat and also pay harbour dues for the past two years, “a cost he can apparently afford”, the newspaper says.

Read article at BBC news – click here

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Categories: Boats

Princess 67 hits Thames Bridge with hundreds of spectators in this week’s Boat Fail.

We weren’t able to not have this video as our boat fail of the week. This chap took advantage of having a beautiful boat on a beautiful weekend, but what happened was far from beautiful.

It appears as the Princess 67 made its was along the Thames to Richmond Bridge, it slowed to take the bridge carefully. However going at the same speed as the tide it was ‘dead’ in the water and lost steerage.
With hundreds of people watching from the banks, the helmsman didn’t back away enough and ended up pinned against the bridge.

See video at Motor Boats Monthly – Click here

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The Royal National Lifeboat Institution (RNLI) has submitted plans today for a new lifeboat station in Scarborough.

 

The charity submitted the plans to Scarborough Borough Council for a new boathouse to replace the existing building on Foreshore Road in the town.

A larger building is needed to house the new state-of-the-art Shannon class lifeboat.

In 2015, Scarborough RNLI’s current all-weather Mersey class lifeboat Fanny Victoria Wilkinson and Frank Stubbs, will be nearing the end of her operational life.  She will be replaced by the newest member of the RNLI fleet.

Scarborough will be one of the first of the charity’s lifeboat stations to receive a Shannon class lifeboat and Supacat bespoke launch and recovery vehicle.

The new plans are designed to offer the necessary extra space required to store the Shannon class lifeboat and Supacat launching vehicle. This will also mean the lifeboat and launch tractor can remain coupled together, which will speed up the launching process. Additionally, a space will be created within the station to enable the charity’s lifeguards to store the equipment for their summer beach safety patrols.

The build is expected to cost around £3million.
It will be funded from various RNLI sources including several generous legacies, donations and money from a variety of past fundraising activities.

Once planning permission has been granted for the new lifeboat station and the contractors have been appointed it is hoped that the build will be completed within a year.

The lifeboat station has been designed by long-established York architects Brierley Groom.

Andrew Ashton, RNLI Divisional Operations Manager, said: ‘The new lifeboat station plans were conceived not only to provide the extra space needed to accommodate the new Shannon lifeboat, but also to upgrade the volunteer crew’s facilities to a standard befitting the next generation of lifesavers.

‘The crew will have a superior space for interactive training, and they’ll also benefit from a state-of-the-art drying room for their kit, which will improve their comfort. The building will also utilise the latest eco-friendly technology, including a ground source heat recovery system.

‘Members of the public have always been encouraged to visit the station, but now they will have the advantage of a more interactive experience in the ‘encounter space’, where temporary exhibitions can take place.

‘Visitors will also be able to see the new Shannon at her best from an enhanced viewing gallery. The station shop will be upgraded and developed too, which will make for an improved retail experience.’

John Senior, Scarborough RNLI Lifeboat Operations Manager, added: ‘We’re very excited about the plans for the new station, although naturally we’ll be sad to say goodbye to the current boathouse when the time comes.

‘The building has a long and distinguished history, and it has certainly served us well in providing a base for saving lives at sea.’

 

See article at Practical Boat Owner – Click here

Less than a week after a charter boat was destoyed by fire in Dartmouth a second boat caught ablaze.

Blue Storm, a 25ft Bayliner, caught fire in Dartmouth harbour just five nights after the blaze on the African Queen.

Blue Storm was moored on the Kingswear trots in the harbour, with her owners and their dog on board, when the fire started.

The owners were unable to extinguish the blaze and escaped in their own tender. They were suffering from smoke inhalation but, following an assessment by a local ambulance crew, able to return to Dartmouth to stay with friends.

The fire was reported to the Coastguard from the shore and the Dart inshore lifeboat was launched at 11.34pm on Saturday, 15 March.

 

After establishing that no one was on board the fiercely burning boat, the RNLI crew took the Dartmouth Fire Commander, Andy Callan, across the harbour to the scene. He ordered the first Dartmouth fire appliance to again be taken on the Lower ferry to the fire.

The Dart lifeboat then escorted two firemen, with their hose running from the appliance on the ferry, as close to the burning boat as they could safely be.

The fire burnt through the Blue Storm‘s mooring lines and she drifted in the light N.E. wind towards the Kingswear shore where she grounded. The nearest boats were some 30 metres away and in no immediate danger.

When the fire was extinguished two of the lifeboat volunteers waded through the mud and secured her to the Kingswear shore.

The operation was carried out at very low tide and the tug of the Lower Ferry briefly grounded before being pulled clear by the inshore lifeboat.

The Torbay RNLI all-weather lifeboat arrived in the harbour at 00.10 but was not able to get close to the scene due to the shallowness of the water. She remained until the Lower ferry was clear of the yacht moorings.

A Devon and Somerset Fire Rescue Service spokesman said: ‘The cause of the fire is believed to be accidential.’
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Practical Boat Owner: For the sixth year running RNLI crew volunteer Marcus Lewis will be hosting a free lifejacket clinic in Fowey on Sunday 6 April 2014.

The event, which will take place from 9.30am until 2pm at the Fowey Gallants Sailing Club, provides the public with free checks of an item of safety equipment that could ultimately save their life.

Marcus, who has been a crew volunteer at the Fowey RNLI lifeboat station for 27 years, is supported by service engineers from Ocean Safety in Plymouth who give their time free of charge to the charity.

Last year they checked 183 lifejackets, of which 13 had to be condemned and around 30% needed replacement parts to ensure they operated properly if used in an emergency.

Marcus said: ‘Last year 56 people visited the clinic in a five hour period and I hope this means the message about just how important it is to have your lifejacket regularly checked is getting through.

‘In 2013 we started the day with a real shock when the very first lifejacket to be looked out had no gas bottle in it, which means it wouldn’t have inflated automatically in a crisis.

These lifejackets could be what saves a person’s life so I can’t stress how important it is to have them checked annually.’

Read article at Practical Boat Owner

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Categories: Marine product launch

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