Piet Vroon, racing his Ker 46, Tonnerre de Breskens, is overall winner.
The 47th edition of Antigua Sailing Week featured five days of racing with a fabulous party atmosphere ashore. Yachts flying the flags of 23 different nations were drawn to the Caribbean’s most prestigious regatta. Sailors came from all over the world for the fantastic weather, extremely competitive racing and fun filled entertainment.

 

The racing was incredibly close, with a number of classes only decided by seconds on the last race and the weather was absolutely glorious. The trade winds were pumping at 15-25 knots all week. Enough to get the thrill of fast action, but still tactically challenging with wind shifts emanating from land effects and cloud bursts.

Piet Vroon’s Ker 46, Tonnerre de Breskens 3 (pictured above), was the overall champion of Antigua Sailing Week. Piet is aged in his 80s and has raced just about every major regatta in the world, including Antigua Sailing Week in the past. Tonnerre scored eight straight wins, the only yacht racing in any CSA Class to do so, and was rightly awarded The Lord Nelson Trophy.

“The team have been racing in Key West, RORC 600, St. Thomas, BVI and Antigua and our worst result in any race has been second. The Tonnerre crew has been together for many years and we have been racing her for six years now, so she is extremely well sailed and highly optimised. Many of the races we had at Antigua Sailing Week were close, which shows it is never easy to come here and win, but I am obviously delighted with the result,” exclaimed Piet.

Irishman David Cullen racing his J/109, Pocket Rocket came so close to a perfect score, but lost out to Norwegian entry, Aage Kristensen’s Frileans in the last race of the regatta. David has lived in the Caribbean for years and is based in St. Barths. Pocket Rocket won CSA 7, Best Caribbean Yacht Start Boat B: “I have been to Antigua Sailing Week for many years and I have to say that this edition has been exceptionally well run on the water, with a very friendly atmosphere ashore. I am sure Pocket Rocket will be back.”

Bernie Evan-Wong’s Mumm 36, High Tension had a champagne regatta winning so many trophies that they needed all of the crew to lift them; Best Caribbean Yacht Start Boat A, Best Antiguan Yacht Start Boat A, Winner of CSA 4 and The Black & White Trophy for the Best Yacht in the Most Competitive Class. Bernie runs a dental practice in St. John and all of the crew are from Antigua. High Tension won the race and the class by just 14 seconds.

“It is an unbelievable end to a fantastic season!” shouted a totally ecstatic Bernie. “High Tension has competed at six Caribbean regattas this season, all of the big ones and to finish off on home soil, winning so many of the trophies that I have wanted to win all my life. It’s like a dream come true! The crew have been just grand all season but to win at Antigua Sailing Week, against very well sailed boats, it is just the icing on the cake.”

Another notable performance by an Antigua yacht was Geoffrey Pidduck’s Six Meter, Biwi Magic, which won six out of eight races to win CSA8 and Best Antigua Yacht Start Boat B. Geoffrey is well into his 70s but races every weekend and this year completed a hat trick of wins at Antigua Sailing Week, having also won class 2013 &2012: “It is getting harder every year. Hightide was very well sailed and so are other boats in the class. It might seem that this was an easy win, but just about every race was won by seconds rather than minutes,” said Geoffrey.

The Best American Yacht and CSA 6 class winner was John Cook’s Tatonka. John joined the crew on stage wearing an Indian Headdress, as a symbol of his roots in South Dakota. “We have had a ball!” exclaimed John. “I haven’t been racing for many years and Antigua Sailing Week has been on my bucket list for ages. Friends have told me what a great regatta this is and they were not joking. The weather conditions have been sublime and everybody here is so friendly. It is just the best!”

Jonty Layfield’s Sleeper won CSA 2. The final race decided by just 12 seconds from Ross Applebey’s Scarlet Oyster. Sleeper’s crew contained three Antiguans: Sean Malone, Ashley Rhodes and Robert Green and there were plenty of Antiguans racing on other yachts, including 21 year-old Stephon Dundas on Selene, which won Best Swan and was second Best British Yacht to Sleeper.

Adrian Lower, owner of Selene spoke about Stephon’s contribution. “This is the second year that Stephon has been on the bow of Selene and his attitude and work ethic is exemplary. Stephon plans to come to England to hone his sailing skills and I have no doubt that he will be successful. It has been a pleasure to race with such a mature young man.”

Twenty eight yachts competed in the Bareboat classes, split into two divisions. Coleman Garvey’s all-Irish was the victor in Bareboat 1 with KH+P Bageal, Sun Odyssey 44i. “Last year we were second, so this was unfinished business,” commented Coleman. “The racing is incredibly close, one mistake and you are out of it. We were pushed very hard by the Ukrainian team led by Rodion Luka who is an Olympic silver medallist. The atmosphere ashore has been grand, the team have made a lot of friends from all over the world during the regatta and with all the bareboats moored together in Nelson’s Dockyard, there has been a great buzz right through the fleet.”

Bareboat 2 and the overall Bareboat title was won by Cayenne, Dufour 44, skippered by Max Katinov. The Russian Team won all seven races and also won the coveted prize of a US$2,500 voucher to use with Antigua Sailing Week sponsor, Sunsail.

Sailing comes first at Antigua Sailing Week, but that doesn’t mean an early night, every night! Tuesday saw the biggest act on stage at Shirley Heights. In front of more than 3000 revellers, Orville Richard Burrell, better known by his stage name SHAGGY, belted out his best known hits, including Boombastic, It Wasn’t Me and Angel. Mr. Lover Lover man sent the crowd in the audience crazy with his smooth lyrics and outrageous stage act.

Lay Day was held the next day on Pigeon Beach, where hundreds of sailors at Antigua Sailing Week chilled out in the crystal blue waters and enjoyed a first class BBQ served by 2011 Caribbean Chef of the Year, Mitchell Husbands from the luxurious Nonsuch Bay Resort. However, even on Lay Day there was fantastic racing action. Right off Pigeon Beach, eight world-class teams battled it out, fleet racing in the Nonsuch Bay RS Elite Challenge.

America’s Cup winner and World Match Racing Champion, Peter Holmberg won the three-race final beating world champions and Volvo Ocean Race sailors. After racing, the Sunset Beach Party included Tug-o-War and other beach games with DJ Sporty, fire dancers and BBQ grills burning long into the night.

Every afternoon after racing, the sailors returned to the hospitality of Antigua Yacht Club, Cloggy’s and Club Sushi, enjoying post race analysis in the perfect setting, as well as being awarded daily prizes sponsored by Johnnie Walker, AUA College of Medicine, English Harbour 5 Year Old Rum and Colombian Emeralds.

The spirit of Antigua Sailing Week was evident at the Final Awards Ceremony at Nelson’s Dockyard. The huge crowd were standing as the Governor General of Antigua & Barbuda, Her Excellency Dame Louise Lake-Tack arrived and the National Anthem of Antigua & Barbuda was skilfully played by pannist, Lacu Samuel. The Hon. Eleston Adams, Minister for Culture also presided over the awards ceremony and every competitor was roundly applauded as they took to the stage. Asher Otto & Itchyfeet played out the night with DJ Purist and the dance floor was alive with revellers into the night.

The 48th Edition of Antigua Sailing Week will take place from the 25th April to 1st May 2015.

For full results, videos, pictures and stories visit: www.sailingweek.com

Read full article at Yachting World – click here

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Categories: At sea

Yachting Monthly: £155,000 worth of yacht abandoned. Three yachtsmen rescued from a life-raft after their 49ft yacht sank in the Atlantic were not insured for her loss

Leonard and Lisa Rorke’s £155,000 Beneteau Oceanis, last surveyed in 2007, was taking in water during a storm 900 miles off Bermuda, so they took to the liferaft with crewman Henri Worthalter and a pet dog.

They were picked up by a British-registered tanker the 351ft Tilda Kosan on passage to Mexico with a freight of gas.

The tanker’s captain used superb seamanship to range alongside the raft in the dark in rough conditions and take them off.

Leonard Rorke, 55, said: ‘We really did not think we were going to live. We were clinging on for our lives when we were found.’

The couple from Oundle, Northamptonshire only had the boat insured for Third Party claims.

They have two daughters back home at their £300,000 detached home.

See article at Yachting Monthly

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Categories: Rescue at sea

Yachting World: Perfect conditions for Day 1 of Antigua Sailing Week

In CSA 4, Ian Hope Ross’ Melges 32, Kick ’em Jenny 2 took the gun and the win on corrected time by just over a minute. Ian’s team from St Maarten is returning to Antigua Sailing Week after racing here last year: “We have a good set-up on the dock, we have sailed down with a catamaran and it’s our mother ship for the week,” explained Ian enjoying a cold Wadadli in the cockpit in Falmouth Marina.

“We didn’t have a good start today and got into bad air. But by the second mark we had stitched it all back together and got into clear air. We had Bernie [Evan-Wong] on High Tension breathing down our neck all day and the two Cork 1720s are very well sailed.

This is a very competitive class, but today the short chop suited us more than the other boats. This is only day one and we are not celebrating too much, there is plenty of racing to come.”

Kick ’em Jenny 2, Ian Hope Ross’ Melges 32 wins CSA 4 in the AUA College of Medicine Race Day
Credit: Tim Wright/Photoaction.com/Antigua Sailing Week
In Class Zero, British Farr 100, ICAP Leopard with owner Mike Slade at the helm, got away to a blistering start and quickly pulled away from the chasing pack including Andy Budgen’s Volvo 70, Monster Project.

Leopard hit the turbo button off the breeze to take line honours by half an hour and the pro-crew was joined today by Mike’s wife, Heather and four friends who enjoyed a high speed sail on one of the world’s fastest yachts: “I love coming here, what is there not to like?” quizzed Mike Slade dockside. “We have been coming to Antigua since 1990 and it is one of my favourite places to sail.

Leopard has been very busy since the start of the year, giving many guests the perfect way to enjoy the Caribbean and Antigua Sailing Week is a marvellous way to round off the season.”

Piet Vroon’s Dutch Ker 46, Tonnerre de Breskens 3, has enjoyed plenty of success in the Caribbean this season and corrected out to win CSA 0 in Race 1 by three minutes from Rob Date’s Australian RP52, Scarlet Runner.

Start Boat B ran courses from Rendezvous Bay past Curtain Bluff and Old Road. The breeze was from the southeast and a shifting breeze kept drivers and trimmers on their toes.

In CSA 6, Tom Wilson racing British Swan 44, Selene corrected out to win Race 1. Selene’s owner Adrian Lower was on board and over the moon about the win: “Absolutely delighted,” commented Adrian. “Tom is an old mate and when he said he was looking for a boat to charter for Antigua Sailing Week, I said yes straight away.

Also on board we have Stephon Dundas, who is from St. John’s, Antigua and is sailing on Selene for the second year in a row. Stephon oversees the front of the boat and I look after the back. We had a good start but we were almost over early, so the heart rate was up a bit there. Selene had a great battle with Tatonka all the way around the track.

The Tatonka team sailed a great race and they obviously know exactly what they are doing. We thought we might have a podium place today but to win was above our expectations. What a brilliant start to the week!”

In Bareboat 1, just four minutes separated the top four boats in a three hour race. Garvey Colman’s Irish team on Bageal is returning after coming second in class last year. Bageal corrected out to win the first race of the regatta by less than a minute from the Kiev Racing Club. Nicholas Jordan’s Just De Ting completed the podium, placing third just ahead of Marcelo Baltzer Foucher’s Pinel.

Bageal’s skipper, Garvey Colman spoke after the race. “We came here last year and didn’t win a single race, so we are delighted to take a win on the first day, but we had to dig deep. We were fifth after the first beat and the boys got properly stuck in to challenge the team from Kiev in the lead.

On the last beat, Kiev was covering us from the front and we took them on in a tacking duel. We were pulling out all the stops and we tired them out to take the win. We enjoy a few beers after racing, but if the first day is anything to go by, we are going to need to be very sharp tomorrow.”

After racing the American University of Antigua College of Medicine Daily Prize Giving drew a big crowd. Chief Marketing Officer, Dr. Cory Greenburg was on stage to hand out the AUA College of Medicine prize bags to the winner and the sailors were delighted. The barbecue grills were smoking and the icemakers were on.

Tonight’s main entertainment is Rum and Rhythms: Reggae with Idus and International sounds from Strays. The America’s Cup Trophy will be on show in the Antigua Yacht Club Marina lounge from 6 to 8 pm. The sun is setting on the first day of Antigua Sailing Week.

See more and video at Yachting World – click here

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Categories: Boat Event

A couple had to be rescued yesterday after their yacht crashed into a metal buoy and sank

Two sailors had to be rescued by volunteers from East Yorkshire lifeboat station yesterday after their yacht sank on the River Humber.

The couple, from Pontefract, had been sailing on the river when their 26ft yacht crashed into a large metal buoy known as the Whitton Light Float.The incident, which occurred at around 1pm, caused the yacht to sink within a matter of seconds and forced the pair to cling to the buoy that they had crashed into.Emergency services were contacted from their mobile phones and Humber rescue went to the aid of the couple.

Neither of the sailors needed hospital treatment and the yacht was recovered, allowing the pair to retrieve any valuables that had been onboard.

Crewmember Jon Wray told the Hull Daily Mail: “Incidents of this nature show the value of volunteer emergency workers. Although we all have jobs to do, our pride in Humber Rescue drives us forward as a team when a call for help comes in.”

Read more at here

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Categories: Accident

Being hit in the face by a flying fish was ‘a hilarious moment’ – British quadriplegic sailor Hilary Lister and Omani Nashwa Al Kindi sailed into the record books last week with two new trans-ocean records.

Hilary, aged 42, and Nashwa, aged 32, spent nine days aboard a 28ft Dragonfly trimaran, covering 850 nautical miles across the Indian Ocean.

Their voyage started from Mumbai, India on Tuesday 11 March and generally took them upwind with winds reaching no more than 10-15kts, and an average boat speed of 5-6kts.

A 36-hour stop to refuel and carry out a repair to the Code Zero sail delayed their overall finish time but they crossed the finishing line in Oman on 19 March before the official welcome took place at The Wave, Muscat on 20 March.

A huge gathering turned out to honour the two women who now hold records for the first ever severely paralysed woman and the first Arab female sailor to make a trans-oceanic crossing.

Hilary, who suffers from a degenerative disease – Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy – and who is paralysed from the neck down, had previously set a record for a solo round-Britain disabled voyage in 2009.

The duo sailed with their ‘guardian angel’ Niall Myatt and Hilary’s carer Lisa Blacklocks.

Hilary said: ‘Niall Myatt’s role was tough. As a sailor his brief was to stay out of everything… something I certainly couldn’t do yet! His experience and advice were absolutely indispensable however.

‘We would have been foolhardy to go to sea without someone of his calibre onboard. How he survived nine days at sea with three women who (in Nash’s words) are definitely slightly “Cuckoo-bananas”, I will never know.’

She added: ‘I am obviously delighted to have set this record with Nashwa. It was a truly amazing journey, particularly the arrival into Oman.

‘More than anything, however, this trip has highlighted that longer offshore legs are a lot easier for me than shorter legs where I am constantly getting on and off the boat.’

The team, powered by Oman Sail and sponsored by Mistal and United Engineering Services, with support from Oman Air, GAC Pindar, Harken, Ocean Safety and Raymarine, sailed a specially adapted Dragonfly.

A sip and puff sailing system

This boat incorporates a unique sip and puff sailing system that sends signals to a device using air pressure. By inhaling or exhaling into a straw Lister is able to steer, trim sails and navigate.

Hilary added: ‘Thanks to Roger Crabtree’s simple ‘plug and play’ sip and puff system, I think we proved that a long distance oceanic passage is highly achievable.

‘This particular creation means I can transfer it from one boat to another, which has inspired me to think about future challenges. In the short term, however, it will be a case of trying to help other people with similar difficulties to me, get on the water by making this system available.”

She described a voyage highlight: “Being on the ocean at night was simply sensational. I will never forget the amount of phosphorescence. The boat looked like it was lit up from underneath and, when I put my hand in the water it was still glowing five minutes later.

‘The funniest moment I had was when a flying fish hit me slap, bang in the middle of the face. It was a hilarious moment, and we still laugh about it now. As well as the serious sailing, we had a lot of fun.’

Hilary’s teammate, Nashwa hopes that becoming the first Arab female to set a new sailing record will inspire other women to follow their dreams.

Nashwa, who is a dinghy sailing instructor at Oman Sail, only started sailing in 2011 but instantly adapted to sport and was recognised as the Coach of the Year in Oman Sail’s Sailor of the Year Awards 2013, and presented with the ISAF President Development Award 2013 for outstanding achievement.

She said: ‘I am very happy and proud to achieve this goal. It was always my dream to sail offshore in a big boat.’

Nashwa’s ‘ultimate goal’ is to sail solo around the world.

Commenting on the trip’s most memorable moments, Nashwa added: ‘I will always remember the little chit-chats I had with Hilary on deck at night. She is a good, experienced sailor and she taught me a lot and she is my biggest inspiration.’

The record-breakers thanked the Navy and Yachting Association of India who played a big role in the logistics of the boat’s departure from India, particularly Captain Jaiswal and Malav Shroff. Oman Air’s spacious business class seats were also complimented for allowing Hilary to travel comfortably from Muscat to Mumbai before embarking on the journey.

Read more at Pratical Boat Owner – click here

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Categories: Boats

Practical Boat Owner: Four men were rescued from a 30ft sailing yacht when they got into difficulties in high winds and a heavy sea near Southend Pier. The crew of the 30ft cruiser were suffering from cold and sea sickness.

Sheerness all weather lifeboat ‘George and Ivy Swanson’ launched at 1.57pm yesterday following a report that the yacht ‘Mirrorcles II’ was unable to make way and its crew were experiencing cold and sea sickness.

Under the command of coxswain Robin Castle, the lifeboat located the casualty with four men on board, approximately half a mile south of Southend Pier, Thames Estuary.

Southend ‘Atlantic’ lifeboat was already on scene and had transferred one crewmember to the craft.

A Sheerness volunteer was also transferred on board and a tow was established for the journey across the Thames Estuary in force seven South Westerly winds and a heavy sea to Queenborough harbour.

After securing the craft on a mooring at Queenborough the four casualties were taken back to Sheerness lifeboat station for warmth and hot refreshments before being picked up by relatives.

Read article at Practical Boat Owner – click here

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Categories: Rescue at sea

If you’ve spent the week sitting in a deserted office wishing you were on holiday like your colleagues, or counting down the days until you’re off, you have my sympathy. It doesn’t matter how hard it’s raining at Cowes Week 2013, or how little the breeze blows, the Isle of Wight in any weather is still more fun than the 0705 to Waterloo.

Having spent the day at my desk on the mainland drove that home. Knowing that I would be heading back to Cowes on Thursday should have made it easy to concentrate on the tasks I had set myself, but I made a fatal mistake. One click on the Cowes TV window on our website was all it took for my productivity, (and I have to say spirit), to take a dive as I watched the action off the RYS start line and the accompanied commentary.

Having said that, if your boss is away and you’re getting bored with tracking auctions on eBay, this year’s Cowes coverage is a superb way of making the hours slip by effortlessly. I only took a look to see if the weather forecast was going to cause problems again. Before I knew it I was playing catch up for the afternoon.A building high pressure system and the previous night’s forecast for light and fickle breezes had looked like they could trip up the racing for a second day at Cowes.

Conscious that the decent breeze could be out to the east, as it had been on the previous day, the race committee decided to take some of the bigger boats in the black group classes out into Hayling Bay where the wind was expected to be more settled. As it turned out, for the White group classes and smaller boats in the Black group that raced in the Solent as normal, the breeze delivered more than had been expected to leave these classes with more space than is normal during the week to play in. Everyone, it seemed was happy. Apart from, that is, us at our desks.

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Categories: Velos Insurance News

On Wednesday 31 July at 9.30am, Trafalgar Square will host the official unveiling and naming of Great Britain’s yacht for the Clipper 2013-14 Round the World Race. ‘Moored’ alongside one of London’s most famous landmarks, Nelson’s Column, and measuring an impressive 70ft, she won’t be hard to miss. She will remain there until Sunday evening 4 August, providing a rare opportunity for race enthusiasts to view the new Clipper 70 out of the water.

The ninth edition of the Clipper Round the World Yacht Race 2013-14 starts Sunday 1 September from St Katharine Docks, London and is anticipated to be the biggest event in the race history. More than 650 people will represent more than 40 different nations on 12 brand new 70ft racing yachts designed by renowned naval architect Tony Castro, and will return almost a year later after completing the 40,000 miles route.

In other Clipper news, PSP has been appointed as the official logistics partner of the 2013-14 event for the third consecutive time.

PSP’s job is to ensure that boats and containers carrying vital maintenance equipment and spare parts will be, in the words of Frank Dixie, managing director of PSP, “Exactly where they’re needed, when they are needed.”

Founder and chairman of the Clipper Race, Sir Robin Knox-Johnston said “I don’t think people appreciate just how vital it is to have a good reliable shipping company when running an international event like the Clipper Race.”

Read more at www.yachtingworld.com/news

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Categories: Velos Insurance News

Successor to the popular Princess 42 will launch at the 2013 Southampton Boat Show – Is this the best kept secret in the world of motorboats? MBM has learned that Princess will be launching a replacement for its all-conquering 42 flybridge at this year’s Southampton Boat Show.

The 42 was a monumental success for Princess, with over 300 built. So, with some refreshing honesty, “Big shoes to fill” is how Princess Yachts International is describing its new 43.

Looking to follow the same two-cabin layout as the outgoing 42, the 43 takes its styling and execution from more recent models like the 52. Sharp minimalist exterior styling mixes with a more contemporary interior. You can bet it will be a big boat, and with huge saloon windows the onboard experience should be sizeably impressive.

Up top the flybridge echoes the 52 with a wet bar and social seating aft. By the helm, there is more seating, converting to a sunbed. Twin transom doors and an optional high/low bathing platform are also offered.

Princess is renowned for introducing new models at very competitive levels and a base price of £390,000 exc VAT keeps the 43 within touching distance of the old 42.

The 43 will be available for viewing at the 2013 Southampton Boat Show on Berth M483.

Pick up the September issue (on sale 15 August) of MBM for full boat show listings for Cannes, Southampton, Amsterdam and many more. Plus, read reviews of the boats set to star this autumn, including the new Princess V48 and Fairline Targa 48.

Princess 43 Specification

LOA 47ft 6in (14.5m)
Beam: 13ft 11in (4.25m)
Displacement: 14.4tonnes
Engines: Twin Volvo Penta D6-370hp / 435hp shaftdrive
Max speed: 30 knots estimated
Enquiries: princessyachts.com

News from Yachting World – Read more click here

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Categories: Velos Insurance News

HMS Ark Royal makes her final voyage…to a Turkish scrapyard
The Royal Navy’s former flagship aircraft carrier, HMS Ark Royal, has left Portsmouth bound for Turkey where she will be scrapped.

Crowds of people turned out to bid a final farewell to HMS Ark Royal yesterday as she left Portsmouthbound for Turkey where she will be scrapped.The well-wishers, which included former crewmembers, many of whom wore black arm bands, gathered at the Round Tower in Old Portsmouth to wave her off shortly after 1pm.Launched on 20 June 1981 by Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth The Queen Mother, she was the fifth vessel to bear the name Ark Royal and was retired in 2010 ending 25 years of service in the Royal Navy, although she wasn’t formally decommissioned until 2011.
Under a deal reportedly worth £2.9m with ship recycling firm Leyal, she is now being towed to Turkey where she will be scrapped, just as her sibling HMS Invincible was.
Former captain of HMS Ark Royal, Sir Alan Massey, told the BBC he would be “sad to see her go to the breakers yard.”Massey said, “Whenever people appeared in public with the Ark Royal name tally on their caps I think they had a spring in their step, they realised that this was a famous name and to an extent there was an expectation that they would be the best.”
     News from Motorboats Monthly Read more – click here
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Categories: Velos Insurance News

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