Motorboat & Yachting: Adriatic marina Porto Montenegro has launched a new scheme, which allows bertholders to rent out their mooring when they are not using it.

 

Mooring your boat in the Mediterranean can be an expensive business, particularly for larger models that take up a longer stretch of pontoon.

With this in mind, Porto Montenegro (pictured above) has come up with a novel way of helping its bertholders keep their costs down.

The Marina Rental Pool allows boatowners to rent out their berth when they are not using it, meaning they can recoup up to 85% of their mooring costs.

Owners only need to give seven days notice to make their berth available for visitors and if it is successfully rented out the marina only keeps 15% of the income.

The scheme is available to bertholders who take out a 15-30 year lease, which can be sold on at any time at market rates.

Nizar Tagi, marina sales director at Porto Montenegro, said: “The rental pool is a great opportunity for those looking for the security of a year-round berth, but still want the flexibility to cruise.

“We know the costs of operating a superyacht can be phenomenal, and with that in mind wanted to make berthing more efficient for our clients.”

Situated on the Adriatic coast, Porto Montenegro features berths for vessels measuring up to 180m and was recently named 2015 Superyacht Marina of the Year by The Yacht Harbour Association.
See Motorboat & Yachting – Click here

Motorboat & Yachting: Saracens has signed a two-year deal with Garmin, which will see gWind sensors fitted to the goalposts at Allianz Park.

 

In the highly competitive world of professional rugby union, teams are always looking to get an advantage, but Saracens have turned to a slightly unusual source.

Marine technology firm Garmin has signed a two-year deal with the North London team that will see wind sensors fitted to the goalposts at Saracens’ home stadium, Allianz Park.

The gWind system (pictured right) will wirelessly relay information to the kicking coach Dan Vickers’ Garmin Quatix GPS watch, allowing him to advise the kicker on the prevailing windspeed and direction.

Garmin claims that this technology will be used during training and before a game to capture the most accurate information. Previously, rugby union teams had used flags to determine the wind direction, but Vickers claims that this is a huge step forward:

“At Saracens we’re really keen to trial and pioneer new technology. Historically, we’ve used flags, but we wanted to explore a more technical solution to this, so we turned to Garmin.

“We are now able to determine the speed and direction of the wind much more effectively during training, which in turn enables us to advise our kickers.”

Saracen’s next home match is against Exeter Chiefs on Sunday (May 10). The team currently sits in third place in the Aviva Premiership with three games left to play this season.

See article at Motorboat & Yachting – Click here

Motorboat & Yachting: The RNLI has teamed up with Newcastle University’s School of Marine Science and Technology to help create the next generation of lifeboats.

 

The road towards the next generation of RNLI lifeboats will start at Newcastle University, after the charity announced a four-year development programme based in the North East.

Students from the university’s School of Marine Science and Technology will be carrying out trials, both in the lab and at sea, to analyse lifeboat design. The team hopes to improve on three key areas: speed, safety, and efficiency.

Lloyds’ Register will be acting as a third-party adviser, helping to peer review the new guidelines for lifeboat design.

Federico Prini (pictured above), research associate at Newcastle University, added: “When the RNLI’s lifeboats travel at speed and in rough seas, they can be subject to frequent and significant slamming as the boat crashes against the waves.

“Measuring these forces and the resulting impact on the vessel is crucial in order to design a craft that is capable of withstanding the loads experienced during rescue operations.”

The resultant design will be used to update the Severn class of lifeboats, the most recent of which was launched in 2005. Measuring in at 17m (55’9”) a Severn lifeboat costs more than £2million to build, and 44 of the 46 launched since 1992 are still in active service.

 

See article at Motorboat & Yachting – Click here

Practical Boat Owner: For the sixth year running RNLI crew volunteer Marcus Lewis will be hosting a free lifejacket clinic in Fowey on Sunday 6 April 2014.

The event, which will take place from 9.30am until 2pm at the Fowey Gallants Sailing Club, provides the public with free checks of an item of safety equipment that could ultimately save their life.

Marcus, who has been a crew volunteer at the Fowey RNLI lifeboat station for 27 years, is supported by service engineers from Ocean Safety in Plymouth who give their time free of charge to the charity.

Last year they checked 183 lifejackets, of which 13 had to be condemned and around 30% needed replacement parts to ensure they operated properly if used in an emergency.

Marcus said: ‘Last year 56 people visited the clinic in a five hour period and I hope this means the message about just how important it is to have your lifejacket regularly checked is getting through.

‘In 2013 we started the day with a real shock when the very first lifejacket to be looked out had no gas bottle in it, which means it wouldn’t have inflated automatically in a crisis.

These lifejackets could be what saves a person’s life so I can’t stress how important it is to have them checked annually.’

Read article at Practical Boat Owner

Home Office postpone e-Borders but the controversial reporting scheme for leisure boaters is still on the cards.

The controversial e-Borders scheme for motorboaters will not be introduced next month, despite long-held government plans to do so. The scheme, designed to combat illegal immigration, is operational for ferries and air traffic, but the UK Border Force has not worked out a way for it to be implemented in a practical way for leisure boatowners.Yet e-Borders has not been scrapped and owners fear it will eventually result in onerous and impractical form-filling for anyone making a cross-Channel passage.

A Home Office spokeswoman, Thea Warren, told MBM: “The guidance I have is that we have made no changes to the reporting requirements for pleasure boats, and there are no plans to do so in the immediate future. In addition, there are no changes to the customs reporting requirements captured by the form C1331 as a result of e-Borders.”

In a 56-page report published in October last year, the Independent Inspector of Borders and Immigration, former chief constable John Vine, published a report into how the scheme’s first 10 years have gone in the airline and ferry industries. His report was widely critical of the scheme and also acknowledged concerns raised by the RYA.

Head of legal and government affairs at the RYA, Gus Lewis, said: “We maintain our long-held view that the e-Borders reporting methodology is simply not designed to accommodate the unscheduled activities of the recreational boating sector. We welcomed the acknowledgement of the legal and practical issues that the RYA pointed out to the e-Borders team several years ago. We will continue to oppose the implementation of a regime in which all cross-border voyages to and from other EU states by recreational craft are required to be notified to the UK government in advance of the voyage.

Read article at Motor Boats Monthly – click here

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